Olympics Games 2020

Olympics Games 2020 The 2020 Summer Olympics officially known as the Games of the ###II Olympiad and commonly known as Tokyo 2020, is an upcoming international multi-sport event that is scheduled to take place from 24 July to 9 August 2020 in Tokyo, Japan

The 2020 Summer Olympics officially known as the Games of the ###II Olympiad and commonly known as Tokyo 2020, is an upcoming international multi-sport event that is scheduled to take place from 24 July to 9 August 2020 in Tokyo, Japan Tokyo was selected as the host city during the 125th IOC Session in Buenos Aires, Argentina on 7 September 2013. This will be the second time that Tokyo has hosted the Summer Olympic Games, the first being in 1964. It is also the first city in Asia to host the summer Olympic Games twice, and overall the fourth Olympics to be held in Japan, which also hosted the Winter Olympics in 1972 (Sapporo) and 1998 (Nagano). The 2020 Games will be the second of three consecutive Olympics to be held in East Asia, the first being the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang County, South Korea, and the next being the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing, China. These Games will see the introduction of new and additional competitions at the Summer Olympics, including 3x3 basketball, freestyle BMX and Madison cycling, as well as further mixed events. Under new IOC policies that allow the host organizing committee to add sports to the Olympic programme to augment the permanent "core" Olympic events, these Games will see karate, sport climbing, surfing and skateboarding make their Olympic debuts. There will also be the return of baseball and softball, both removed from the summer programme after 2008. Bidding process Further information: Bids for the 2020 Summer Olympics Tokyo, Istanbul, and Madrid were the three candidate cities. The applicant cities of Baku (Azerbaijan) and Doha (Qatar) were not promoted to candidate status. A bid from Rome was withdrawn. Host city selection The IOC voted to select the host city of the 2020 Summer Olympics on 7 September 2013 at the 125th IOC Session at the Buenos Aires Hilton in Buenos Aires, Argentina. An exhaustive ballot system was used. No city won over 50% of the votes in the first round, and Madrid and Istanbul were tied for second place. A run-off vote between these two cities was held to determine which would be eliminated. In the final vote, a head-to-head contest between Tokyo and Istanbul, Tokyo was selected by 60 votes to 36, as it got at least 49 votes needed for a majority. Development and preparation The Tokyo Metropolitan Government set aside a fund of 400 billion Japanese yen (over 3.67 billion USD) to cover the cost of hosting the Games. The Japanese government is considering increasing slot capacity at both Haneda Airport and Narita International Airport by easing airspace restrictions. A new railway line is planned to link both airports through an expansion of Tokyo Station, cutting travel time from Tokyo Station to Haneda from 30 minutes to 18 minutes, and from Tokyo Station to Narita from 55 minutes to 36 minutes; the line would cost 400 billion yen and would be funded primarily by private investors, but East Japan Railway Company (East JR) is planning a new route near Tamachi to Haneda Airport. Funding is also planned to accelerate completion of the Central Circular Route, Tokyo Gaikan Expressway and Ken-Ō Expressway, and to refurbish other major expressways in the area. There are also plans to extend the Yurikamome automated transit line from its existing terminal at Toyosu Station to a new terminal at Kachidoki Station, passing the site of the Olympic Village, although the Yurikamome would still not have adequate capacity to serve major events in the Odaiba area on its own. The Tokyo Organizing Committee is headed by former Prime Minister Yoshirō Mori. Olympic and Paralympic Minister Seiko Hashimoto is overseeing the preparations on behalf of the Japanese government. Venues and infrastructure In February 2012, it was announced that the National Stadium in Tokyo, the central venue for the 1964 Summer Olympics, would undergo a ¥100 billion renovation for the 2019 Rugby World Cup and the 2020 Olympics. In November 2012, the Japan Sport Council announced that it would take bids for proposed designs. Of 46 finalists, Zaha Hadid Architects was awarded the project, which would replace the stadium with a new, 80,000-seat stadium. The stadium faced criticism over its design (which was compared to a bicycle helmet, and judged as clashing with the surrounding Meiji Shrine) and its costs, even with attempts to revise and "optimise" the design. In June 2015, the government announced that as a further cost-savings measure, it would reduce the new stadium's permanent capacity to 65,000 in its athletics configuration (although with the option to add up to 15,000 temporary seats for football). The government also scrapped plans to build a retractable roof. Due to public outcry over the increasing costs of the stadium (which reached ¥252 billion), the government ultimately chose to scrap the Zaha Hadid design entirely, and chose a new design by Japanese architect Kengo Kuma. Inspired by traditional temples and having a lower profile, Kuma's design has a budget of ¥149 billion. Due to the changes in plans, the new stadium would not be completed in time for the Rugby World Cup as originally planned. In October 2018, the Board of Audit issued a report stating that the total cost of the venues could exceed US$25 billion. Of the 33 competition venues in Tokyo, 28 are within 8 kilometers (4.97 miles) of the Olympic Village. Eleven new venues are to be constructed. On 16 October 2019, the IOC announced that there were plans to re-locate the marathon and racewalking events to Sapporo due to heat concerns. The plans were made official on 1 November 2019 after Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike accepted the IOC's decision, despite her belief that the events should have remained in Tokyo. Heritage Zone Seven venues for nine sports will be located within the central business area of Tokyo, northwest of the Olympic Village. Some of these venues were originally constructed for the 1964 Summer Olympics.

Mission: The 2020 Summer Olympics officially known as the Games of the ###II Olympiad and commonly known as Tokyo 2020, is an upcoming international multi-sport event that is scheduled to take place from 24 July to 9 August 2020 in Tokyo, Japan. Tokyo was selected as the host city during the 125th IOC Session in Buenos Aires, Argentina on 7 September 2013. This will be the second time that Tokyo has hosted the Summer Olympic Games, the first being in 1964. It is also the first city in Asia to host the summer Olympic Games twice, and overall the fourth Olympics to be held in Japan, which also hosted the Winter Olympics in 1972 (Sapporo) and 1998 (Nagano). The 2020 Games will be the second of three consecutive Olympics to be held in East Asia, the first being the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang County, South Korea, and the next being the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing, China. These Games will see the introduction of new and additional competitions at the Summer Olympics, including 3x3 basketball, freestyle BMX and Madison cycling, as well as further mixed events. Under new IOC policies that allow the host organizing committee to add sports to the Olympic programme to augment the permanent "core" Olympic events, these Games will see karate, sport climbing, surfing and skateboarding make their Olympic debuts. There will also be the return of baseball and softball, both removed from the summer programme after 2008. Bidding process Further information: Bids for the 2020 Summer Olympics Tokyo, Istanbul, and Madrid were the three candidate cities. The applicant cities of Baku (Azerbaijan) and Doha (Qatar) were not promoted to candidate status. A bid from Rome was withdrawn. Host city selection The IOC voted to select the host city of the 2020 Summer Olympics on 7 September 2013 at the 125th IOC Session at the Buenos Aires Hilton in Buenos Aires, Argentina. An exhaustive ballot system was used. No city won over 50% of the votes in the first round, and Madrid and Istanbul were tied for second place. A run-off vote between these two cities was held to determine which would be eliminated. In the final vote, a head-to-head contest between Tokyo and Istanbul, Tokyo was selected by 60 votes to 36, as it got at least 49 votes needed for a majority. Development and preparation The Tokyo Metropolitan Government set aside a fund of 400 billion Japanese yen (over 3.67 billion USD) to cover the cost of hosting the Games. The Japanese government is considering increasing slot capacity at both Haneda Airport and Narita International Airport by easing airspace restrictions. A new railway line is planned to link both airports through an expansion of Tokyo Station, cutting travel time from Tokyo Station to Haneda from 30 minutes to 18 minutes, and from Tokyo Station to Narita from 55 minutes to 36 minutes; the line would cost 400 billion yen and would be funded primarily by private investors, but East Japan Railway Company (East JR) is planning a new route near Tamachi to Haneda Airport. Funding is also planned to accelerate completion of the Central Circular Route, Tokyo Gaikan Expressway and Ken-Ō Expressway, and to refurbish other major expressways in the area. There are also plans to extend the Yurikamome automated transit line from its existing terminal at Toyosu Station to a new terminal at Kachidoki Station, passing the site of the Olympic Village, although the Yurikamome would still not have adequate capacity to serve major events in the Odaiba area on its own. The Tokyo Organizing Committee is headed by former Prime Minister Yoshirō Mori. Olympic and Paralympic Minister Seiko Hashimoto is overseeing the preparations on behalf of the Japanese government. Venues and infrastructure In February 2012, it was announced that the National Stadium in Tokyo, the central venue for the 1964 Summer Olympics, would undergo a ¥100 billion renovation for the 2019 Rugby World Cup and the 2020 Olympics. In November 2012, the Japan Sport Council announced that it would take bids for proposed designs. Of 46 finalists, Zaha Hadid Architects was awarded the project, which would replace the stadium with a new, 80,000-seat stadium. The stadium faced criticism over its design (which was compared to a bicycle helmet, and judged as clashing with the surrounding Meiji Shrine) and its costs, even with attempts to revise and "optimise" the design. In June 2015, the government announced that as a further cost-savings measure, it would reduce the new stadium's permanent capacity to 65,000 in its athletics configuration (although with the option to add up to 15,000 temporary seats for football). The government also scrapped plans to build a retractable roof. Due to public outcry over the increasing costs of the stadium (which reached ¥252 billion), the government ultimately chose to scrap the Zaha Hadid design entirely, and chose a new design by Japanese architect Kengo Kuma. Inspired by traditional temples and having a lower profile, Kuma's design has a budget of ¥149 billion. Due to the changes in plans, the new stadium would not be completed in time for the Rugby World Cup as originally planned. In October 2018, the Board of Audit issued a report stating that the total cost of the venues could exceed US$25 billion. Of the 33 competition venues in Tokyo, 28 are within 8 kilometers (4.97 miles) of the Olympic Village. Eleven new venues are to be constructed. On 16 October 2019, the IOC announced that there were plans to re-locate the marathon and racewalking events to Sapporo due to heat concerns. The plans were made official on 1 November 2019 after Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike accepted the IOC's decision, despite her belief that the events should have remained in Tokyo. Heritage Zone Seven venues for nine sports will be located within the central business area of Tokyo, northwest of the Olympic Village. Some of these venues were originally constructed for the 1964 Summer Olympics.

10/07/2020
Out of Town/Fab Feet

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#redletterday#flamereds#navy white#happy#oswestryopen#20%off# OPEN 10-3pm💕

Olympics Games 2020's cover photo
06/07/2020

Olympics Games 2020's cover photo

05/07/2020
Lacry Couture

Lacry Couture

A little inside scenes of an exciting fashion photography with an extremely talented team !!
Thank you so much for your hard work Gabriella Leonardi @jvc.synthesis @kimhardyphotography @maas_dust @ejhairandmakeup

Editorial coming soon!!

#fashioneditorial #lockdownfashion #bririshdesigner #britishstyle #britishphotography #couturedesign #bespokedesign #summeredition #exclusiveedition #lockdowncollection #ecofriendly

Olympics Games 2020's cover photo
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Olympics Games 2020's cover photo

Today at Much Wenlock Christmas FayreMuch Wenlock is the birth place and home of the founder of the modern Olympic Games...
07/12/2019

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Much Wenlock Christmas Fayre 2019 07-12-2019

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Lots of images to follow

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02/12/2019

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Olympics Games 2020's cover photo
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Olympics Games 2020's cover photo

VLSA
17/05/2019

VLSA

Are you at #TheBusinessShow2019

Come and say hello at stand 942

Happy Easter to All - 'Enjoy your Easter eggs'
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Tech Severn 2018 Bringing together the worlds of; health, care, construction, and the environment under one roof with the aim of solving some of the UK’s biggest issues is the ambition of Tech Severn. Held in Shrewsbury on 17th July 2018 you will hear about Shropshire Council and the University Centre Shrewsbury’s 4 Centres of Excellence; see the launch of several high-profile partnership initiatives including “The ONE Scheme” and “The Tech Gym” as well as learn how Shropshire is fast becoming a hub for innovation and creative technology industries unrivalled on the national stage

Tech Severn 2018 Bringing together the worlds of; health, care, construction, and the environment under one roof with the aim of solving some of the UK’s biggest issues is the ambition of Tech Severn. Held in Shrewsbury on 17th July 2018 you will hear about Shropshire Council and the University Centre Shrewsbury’s 4 Centres of Excellence; see the launch of several high-profile partnership initiatives including “The ONE Scheme” and “The Tech Gym” as well as learn how Shropshire is fast becoming a hub for innovation and creative technology industries unrivalled on the national stage

Commonwealth Games 2018, Gold Coast, Australia (A)
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Commonwealth Games 2018, Gold Coast, Australia (A)

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Gilbert & Gordon - Diamond Ring Tea Dance - Sat 24th Feb 2018 (b) #heritageopendays #heritageopenday #gilbertandgordon #...
05/03/2018

Gilbert & Gordon - Diamond Ring Tea Dance - Sat 24th Feb 2018 (b)
#heritageopendays
#heritageopenday
#gilbertandgordon
#oswestrymuseum
#oswestrytownmuseum

Gilbert & Gordon - Diamond Ring Tea Dance - Sat 24th Feb 2018 (b)
#heritageopendays
#heritageopenday
#gilbertandgordon
#oswestrymuseum
#oswestrytownmuseum

Gilbert & Gordon - Diamond Ring Tea Dance - Sat 24th Feb 2018 (a)#heritageopendays#heritageopenday#gilbertandgordon#oswe...
05/03/2018

Gilbert & Gordon - Diamond Ring Tea Dance - Sat 24th Feb 2018 (a)
#heritageopendays
#heritageopenday
#gilbertandgordon
#oswestrymuseum
#oswestrytownmuseum

Gilbert & Gordon - Diamond Ring Tea Dance - Sat 24th Feb 2018 (a)
#heritageopendays
#heritageopenday
#gilbertandgordon
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Olympics Games 2020's cover photo
23/02/2018

Olympics Games 2020's cover photo

Olympics Games 2020's cover photo
10/02/2018

Olympics Games 2020's cover photo

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Olympics Games 2020's cover photo

23rd Winter Olympic GamesOpening Ceremony 2018#Winter Olympics#WinterOlympics#Winter Olympic Games#WinterOlympicGames#20...
09/02/2018

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#Winter Olympics
#WinterOlympics
#Winter Olympic Games
#WinterOlympicGames
#2018 Winter Olympic Games
#2018WinterOlympicGames
#2018WinterOlympics
#2018 Winter Olympics
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#Fashion Week
#Paris Fashion Week
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#London Fashion Week
#NY Fashion Week
#FashionWeek
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#MilanFashionWeek
#LondonFashionWeek
#NYFashionWeek
#CoutureFashionWeek
#Couture Fashion Week
#HauteCoutureFashionWeek

23rd Winter Olympic Games
Opening Ceremony 2018

#Winter Olympics
#WinterOlympics
#Winter Olympic Games
#WinterOlympicGames
#2018 Winter Olympic Games
#2018WinterOlympicGames
#2018WinterOlympics
#2018 Winter Olympics
#2018 Olympics
#Olympics
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#Olympic Winter Games
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#Fashion Week
#Paris Fashion Week
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08/02/2018
The Independent

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Military parade in North Korea capital on eve of Winter Olympics

Olympics Games 2020
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22/12/2017
Savoie Mont Blanc

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Fancy a longish walk through the festively illuminated streets of beautiful Chamonix? 🎄🏘✨

MUCH WENLOCK CHRISTMAS FAYRE 2017...The Wenlock Olympian Games established by Dr William Penny Brookes in 1850 are centr...
08/12/2017

MUCH WENLOCK CHRISTMAS FAYRE 2017...
The Wenlock Olympian Games established by Dr William Penny Brookes in 1850 are centred in the town... Dr Brookes is credited as a founding father of the modern Olympic Games, and one of the Olympic mascots for London 2012 was named Wenlock after the town... Dr William Penny Brookes is buried in the town...
uch Wenlock Christmas Fayre is a Shropshire Christmas fayre not to be missed!..
Over 200 eclectic Christmas stalls line the streets and Church Green of the quintessential market town of Much Wenlock in beautiful Shropshire...
Enjoy the Brass Bands, Choirs, Street Theatre & Entertainers, Santa Claus, Donkey Rides,
Children’s Entertainment, Carols by Candlelight in The Square and much, much more!..
Disabled Parking and Park & Ride facilities are available...
Rich in seasonal atmosphere...
Delightful Christmassy setting with light snow on order!..
Much Wenlock Christmas Fayre is always held on the first Saturday in December and has been running since 2001,,,
becoming a popular focal point in Shropshire’s festive diary, with thousands attending over the years!
Everyone welcome.
The Fayre kicks off December 2nd at 10am

MUCH WENLOCK CHRISTMAS FAYRE 2017...
The Wenlock Olympian Games established by Dr William Penny Brookes in 1850 are centred in the town... Dr Brookes is credited as a founding father of the modern Olympic Games, and one of the Olympic mascots for London 2012 was named Wenlock after the town... Dr William Penny Brookes is buried in the town...
uch Wenlock Christmas Fayre is a Shropshire Christmas fayre not to be missed!..
Over 200 eclectic Christmas stalls line the streets and Church Green of the quintessential market town of Much Wenlock in beautiful Shropshire...
Enjoy the Brass Bands, Choirs, Street Theatre & Entertainers, Santa Claus, Donkey Rides,
Children’s Entertainment, Carols by Candlelight in The Square and much, much more!..
Disabled Parking and Park & Ride facilities are available...
Rich in seasonal atmosphere...
Delightful Christmassy setting with light snow on order!..
Much Wenlock Christmas Fayre is always held on the first Saturday in December and has been running since 2001,,,
becoming a popular focal point in Shropshire’s festive diary, with thousands attending over the years!
Everyone welcome.
The Fayre kicks off December 2nd at 10am

Llangollen International Eisteddfod
17/11/2017

Llangollen International Eisteddfod

Llangollen International Eisteddfod

17/11/2017

IOC Executive Board meeting in Lausanne, 5 and 6 December 2017 – Information for the media

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) Executive Board (EB) will meet in Lausanne on 5 and 6 December 2017.

A decision with regard to the participation of Russian athletes in the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 will be taken by the IOC Executive Board, based on the findings of the two Commissions led by the former President of Switzerland, Samuel Schmid, and IOC Member Denis Oswald. A press conference will be organised to announce the decision at 7.30 p.m. on Tuesday 5 December.

The EB is also scheduled to receive reports from various IOC commissions, as well as updates on the activities of the IOC administration and the preparations for the forthcoming Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018.

13/11/2017

Gender equality advocates and coaches receive IOC awards

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) this evening celebrated six role models and change-makers in advancing women in and through sport; and recognised two outstanding coaches for their lifetime achievements.

2017 IOC Women and Sport Awards: six trophies, one goal

Finnish advocate of grassroots sports and gender equality Mrs Birgitta Kervinen was awarded the World Trophy for her tireless and long-standing efforts to promote gender equality in sport and society. Having enjoyed an extensive and influential career as a voluntary sports leader both nationally and internationally, Kervinen has been instrumental in uplifting and mainstreaming gender equality, and is a role model for many women and girls.

Five Continental Trophies were awarded to the following people:

- Winner for Africa: Ms Lidé Anne Ouoba Zoma (Burkina Faso)

As one of the first women in her country to compete in long-distance running at an international level, Zoma has worked towards removing the barriers that prevent girls from participating in sport.

- Winner for the Americas: Dr Patricia Sangenis (Argentina)

A medical doctor and former athlete, Dr Sangenis has worked towards raising awareness of female athlete health, helping to debunk myths about women’s sporting performance.

- Winner for Asia: Japan Ladies Tennis Federation (Japan)

The Japan Ladies Tennis Federation has actively promoted women’s participation in tennis in a variety of ways, producing world-class Japanese players along the way and increasing women’s participation in sport.

- Winner for Europe: Ms Androulla Vassiliou (Cyprus)

The Former European Commissioner for Sport has been instrumental in placing gender equality in sport within European Union policy-making.

- Winner for Oceania: Mrs Judy Otto (Palau)

The President of the Palau Swimming Association has played a key role in encouraging women’s sport participation in the country and enhancing commitment to health and active living.

For more information on the winners and the Trophies, read the IOC Women and Sport Awards 2017 Brochure.

IOC Women in Sport Commission Chair Lydia Nsekera congratulated the winners on their achievements and said: “I am delighted that the IOC is honouring so many inspirational role models with this year’s IOC Women and Sport Awards. Each winner has shown what can be achieved by those who are committed to empowering women and girls through sport – giving them the opportunity to break free of barriers and negative stereotypes and demonstrate what they are truly capable of.”

Introduced in 2000, the IOC Women and Sport Awards are given to women, men or organisations who have made remarkable contributions to the development, encouragement and reinforcement of women’s participation in sport. One World Trophy and five Continental Trophies are awarded every year.

IOC Coaches Lifetime Achievement Awards: recognising those behind the athletes

Acknowledging the exceptional role of coaches in an athlete’s life, the IOC’s first-ever Coaches Lifetime Achievement Awards were given to retired Japanese synchronised swimming coach Kaneko Masako and retired American swimming coach Jon Urbanchek.

Kaneko Masako (JAP) has set a leading example both as a swimmer and a coach since the beginning of synchronised swimming in her country. As a coach, she has achieved outstanding success developing swimmers from beginner to Olympic-standard. Masako is the only person to have coached medal-winning swimmers at every Olympic Games from 1984 to 2004 and to have medal winners in all but one World Championships from 1978 to 2007.

Jon Urbanchek (USA) has developed swimmers into Olympic medallists, world champions and world record holders throughout his coaching career. He has taken over 40 swimmers to represent their country at six editions of the Olympic Games from Barcelona 1992 to London 2012, bringing home over 20 Olympic medals, including 11 golds. Highly respected by his athletes, Urbanchek has also contributed significantly to their personal development beyond the swimming arena.

IOC Athletes' Entourage Commission Chair Sergey Bubka said: "The role of a coach for an athlete goes beyond the field. It is about a journey and long-term collaboration. It is a great pleasure to honour the first two winners of the IOC Coaches Lifetime Achievement Awards for their outstanding contributions to Olympians’ live and the Olympic Movement."

This Award, given to one female and one male retired coach, is an initiative of the IOC Athletes' Entourage Commission to raise awareness about the athletes’ entourage and recognise the important role coaches play in supporting athletes on the road to their sporting dreams.

09/11/2017

IOC sanctions four Russian athletes and closes one case as part of Oswald Commission findings


Today, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has published new conclusions from the Oswald Commission hearings, which are being conducted in the context of the Sochi 2014 forensic and analytic doping investigations. As a result, the four Russian cross country skiers, Yuliia Ivanova, Alexey Petukhov, Evgeniya Shapovalova and Sochi 2014 three-time silver medallist Maksim Vylegzhanin, have been sanctioned. The case opened against a fifth athlete has been closed without a sanction.

More hearings concerning other athletes will be held over the next few weeks.

The IOC Disciplinary Commission, composed for these four cases of Mr Denis Oswald (Chairman), Mr Juan Antonio Samaranch and Mr Patrick Baumann, decided the following:

Yuliia IVANOVA, Alexey PETUKHOV, Evgeniya SHAPOVALOVA and Maksim VYLEGZHANIN are found to have committed anti-doping rule violations pursuant to Article 2 of The International Olympic Committee Anti-Doping Rules applicable to the XXII Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, in 2014, and are disqualified from the events in which they participated. In addition, the four athletes are declared ineligible to be accredited in any capacity for all editions of the Games of the Olympiad and the Olympic Winter Games subsequent to the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014.

The full decision about Yuliia IVANOVA is available here.

The full decision about Alexey PETUKHOV is available here.

The full decision about Evgeniya SHAPOVALOVA is available here.

The full decision about Maksim VYLEGZHANIN is available here.

The reasoning for these decisions will be communicated in due course.

In addition to these four decisions, the IOC Disciplinary Commission has issued a fifth decision in which it found that the elements in the file and the conclusions of the investigations conducted so far were not sufficient to establish an anti-doping rule violation. Accordingly, the disciplinary proceedings opened against the athlete were terminated and the case filed. In order to protect the rights of the athlete, the identity of the athlete concerned will not be disclosed and the decision will not be published at this point in time.

The Disciplinary Commission, chaired by IOC Member Denis Oswald, is responsible for investigating the alleged doping violations by individual Russian athletes. Therefore, all the samples collected from Russian athletes at the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014 that were available to the IOC were re-analysed. This had two goals – to further review the samples for evidence of doping, and separately to determine if the samples themselves or the bottles were manipulated or tampered with.

Due to the nature and complexity of the cases, this thorough, comprehensive and time-consuming process has taken several months and had to involve external forensic experts, who had to develop a legally-defendable methodology for all the cases under the jurisdiction of the Disciplinary Commission. Due process has to be followed, and re-analysis is still underway.

The IOC showed its determination to protect clean athletes from the very beginning of the case, in July 2016, by immediately establishing the Disciplinary Commission and the Inquiry Commissions, following the publication of the McLaren report. The IOC took this extra measure since Prof. McLaren did not have the authority to bring forward Anti-Doping Rule Violation (ADRV) cases against individual athletes.

After receiving the results from the final McLaren report in December 2016, the IOC opened proceedings against the 28 Russian athletes mentioned in the report, which are now being heard by the Oswald Commission.

The Oswald Commission has announced that all hearings for active athletes who could qualify for the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 will be completed by the end of November 2017. In accordance with the World Anti-Doping Code, confidentiality has to be respected in the interests of the athletes concerned. The purpose of this work is to ensure that the International Federations (IFs) have the necessary tools to protect the qualification competitions. The outcome of the hearings will be announced as soon as possible after each individual hearing. This will allow the IFs to follow up with their own disciplinary hearings immediately, and to take the athletes concerned out of the qualification system as soon as possible.

The decision with regard to the participation of Russian athletes in the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 will be taken by the IOC Executive Board in December based on the findings of the Inquiry Commission chaired by Samuel Schmid, a former President of Switzerland.

Click here for more information about the IOC Disciplinary and Inquiry commissions and the Sochi 2014 forensic and analytic investigations.

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Our Story

The 2020 Summer Olympics officially known as the Games of the ###II Olympiad and commonly known as Tokyo 2020, is an upcoming international multi-sport event that is scheduled to take place from 24 July to 9 August 2020 in Tokyo, Japan.

Tokyo was selected as the host city during the 125th IOC Session in Buenos Aires, Argentina on 7 September 2013. This will be the second time that Tokyo has hosted the Summer Olympic Games, the first being in 1964. It is also the first city in Asia to host the summer Olympic Games twice, and overall the fourth Olympics to be held in Japan, which also hosted the Winter Olympics in 1972 (Sapporo) and 1998 (Nagano). The 2020 Games will be the second of three consecutive Olympics to be held in East Asia, the first being the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang County, South Korea, and the next being the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing, China.

These Games will see the introduction of new and additional competitions at the Summer Olympics, including 3x3 basketball, freestyle BMX and Madison cycling, as well as further mixed events. Under new IOC policies that allow the host organizing committee to add sports to the Olympic programme to augment the permanent "core" Olympic events, these Games will see karate, sport climbing, surfing and skateboarding make their Olympic debuts. There will also be the return of baseball and softball, both removed from the summer programme after 2008.

Bidding process

Tokyo, Istanbul, and Madrid were the three candidate cities. The applicant cities of Baku (Azerbaijan) and Doha (Qatar) were not promoted to candidate status. A bid from Rome was withdrawn.

Host city selection

The IOC voted to select the host city of the 2020 Summer Olympics on 7 September 2013 at the 125th IOC Session at the Buenos Aires Hilton in Buenos Aires, Argentina. An exhaustive ballot system was used. No city won over 50% of the votes in the first round, and Madrid and Istanbul were tied for second place. A run-off vote between these two cities was held to determine which would be eliminated. In the final vote, a head-to-head contest between Tokyo and Istanbul, Tokyo was selected by 60 votes to 36, as it got at least 49 votes needed for a majority.

Development and preparation

The Tokyo Metropolitan Government set aside a fund of 400 billion Japanese yen (over 3.67 billion USD) to cover the cost of hosting the Games. The Japanese government is considering increasing slot capacity at both Haneda Airport and Narita International Airport by easing airspace restrictions. A new railway line is planned to link both airports through an expansion of Tokyo Station, cutting travel time from Tokyo Station to Haneda from 30 minutes to 18 minutes, and from Tokyo Station to Narita from 55 minutes to 36 minutes; the line would cost 400 billion yen and would be funded primarily by private investors, but East Japan Railway Company (East JR) is planning a new route near Tamachi to Haneda Airport. Funding is also planned to accelerate completion of the Central Circular Route, Tokyo Gaikan Expressway and Ken-Ō Expressway, and to refurbish other major expressways in the area. There are also plans to extend the Yurikamome automated transit line from its existing terminal at Toyosu Station to a new terminal at Kachidoki Station, passing the site of the Olympic Village, although the Yurikamome would still not have adequate capacity to serve major events in the Odaiba area on its own.

The Tokyo Organizing Committee is headed by former Prime Minister Yoshirō Mori. Olympic and Paralympic Minister Seiko Hashimoto is overseeing the preparations on behalf of the Japanese government.

Venues and infrastructure

In February 2012, it was announced that the National Stadium in Tokyo, the central venue for the 1964 Summer Olympics, would undergo a ¥100 billion renovation for the 2019 Rugby World Cup and the 2020 Olympics. In November 2012, the Japan Sport Council announced that it would take bids for proposed designs. Of 46 finalists, Zaha Hadid Architects was awarded the project, which would replace the stadium with a new, 80,000-seat stadium. The stadium faced criticism over its design (which was compared to a bicycle helmet, and judged as clashing with the surrounding Meiji Shrine) and its costs, even with attempts to revise and "optimise" the design.

In June 2015, the government announced that as a further cost-savings measure, it would reduce the new stadium's permanent capacity to 65,000 in its athletics configuration (although with the option to add up to 15,000 temporary seats for football). The government also scrapped plans to build a retractable roof. Due to public outcry over the increasing costs of the stadium (which reached ¥252 billion), the government ultimately chose to scrap the Zaha Hadid design entirely, and chose a new design by Japanese architect Kengo Kuma. Inspired by traditional temples and having a lower profile, Kuma's design has a budget of ¥149 billion. Due to the changes in plans, the new stadium would not be completed in time for the Rugby World Cup as originally planned.

In October 2018, the Board of Audit issued a report stating that the total cost of the venues could exceed US$25 billion.

Of the 33 competition venues in Tokyo, 28 are within 8 kilometers (4.97 miles) of the Olympic Village. Eleven new venues are to be constructed. On 16 October 2019, the IOC announced that there were plans to re-locate the marathon and racewalking events to Sapporo due to heat concerns. The plans were made official on 1 November 2019 after Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike accepted the IOC's decision, despite her belief that the events should have remained in Tokyo.

Heritage Zone

Seven venues for nine sports will be located within the central business area of Tokyo, northwest of the Olympic Village. Some of these venues were originally constructed for the 1964 Summer Olympics.

événements/lieux á proximité


Autres Évènement sportif à Paris

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Commentaires

2002 Official Winter Olympic Torch For Sale
Olympic Shame..
Your hosts are uncivilised animal murderers
I am so upset right now in mens figure skating. USA and ITALY was flawless and CANADA fell twice and got a HIGHER score!! CRAP
I’ve never really watched the snowboarding before but am wondering why they wear trousers that fall down?
THE OLYMPIC COMMITTEE BEGAN TO ENGAGE IN ARBITRARY TO DISQUALIFY RUSSIAN ATHLETES FOR NO REASON!!! SHAME THE OLYMPIC MOVEMENT!!!👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎👎
not to be rude to anyone at all.... if soldiers are fleeing north korea... why is it we have an olympics at that location... who says they are safe to be competing in a dictatorship location... i look at it this way... we are on the verge of repeat like in 1936... only a different dictator.... enough said..