BadShot-GunShow

BadShot-GunShow Gun Show Promoter, Cowboy Action shooter, Hunter,
2nd Amendment rights supporter Matt and Pattie Hindi are the official promoters for Badshot Shows.

I conduct my shows currently in following locations:
Grady County fairgrounds, Chickasha, OK. National Guard Armory, Ponca City, Ok. Logan County Fairgrounds, Guthrie, OK. Murray County Fairgrounds, Sulphur, OK. Texas County Fairgrounds, Guymon, OK. McCurtain County Fairgrounds, Idabel, OK. Washington County Fairgrounds, Dewey, Ok. Coffeyville, Kansas
Las Vegas, New Mexico

Operating as usual

Photos from The National WWII Museum's post
09/13/2021

Photos from The National WWII Museum's post

06/10/2021

Raton New Mexico show June 19-20 don’t miss it

05/31/2021
03/22/2021

Next show April 3-4 2021 Sulphur, Oklahoma Murray county expo

12/26/2020

Merry Christmas to everyone from us to you may you have a blessed day

National Medal of Honor Museum
10/12/2020

National Medal of Honor Museum

On this day, Arlington, Texas, hero Col. Neel Kearby earned the Medal of Honor during World War II. Kearby was a flying ace, setting a record for the number of downed enemy aircraft on a single day of air combat operations over New Guinea in 1943. https://mohmuseum.org/medal_of_honor/kearby-neel-e/

Traces of Texas
10/05/2020

Traces of Texas

Well, it isn't often that I learn something that just blows my mind but I learned something today that blows my mind. Ready for this? The six year-old boy who voiced the character of Bambi in the classic Walt Disney movie grew up to become a highly-decorated marine and is now 86 years old and ---- retired of course ---- he lives in San Angelo, tutors math and physics, and still rides a Harley. His name is Donnie Dunagan, and he was Bambi.
https://www.npr.org/2015/07/31/427821763/major-bambi-meet-the-marine-who-was-disney-s-famous-fawn

How did I not know this?

Thanks to Traces of Texas reader Guy Choate for letting me know about a Texas life well lived.

10/02/2020

FREE Tables at our Altus Oklahoma show Oct 31-Nov 1st 2020 first come first serve to this show. It is pay day weekend for Altus Air Force base. We only have about (100) 8’ tables so don’t delay booking the show. This is our way of giving back for the years of support for our shows

Hell Yes R***r/Marlin a win in my book
10/01/2020

Hell Yes R***r/Marlin a win in my book

We are proud to announce that our offer to purchase substantially all of the Marlin Fi****ms assets was accepted by Re*****on Outdoor Company, Inc. and approved by the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of Alabama. Additional information will be released when available. To stay up to date, please sign up for our contact list at R***r.com/Marlin.

WWII Airborne Demonstration Team
09/04/2020

WWII Airborne Demonstration Team

It doesn't get any better than this!—An honor flight with some WWII Veterans, all of whom have unique stories. One a prisoner. The other his liberator. Another, a man who was present at the signing of the Imperial Japanese Surrender. And, a married couple, one who was in the infantry during the war and his bride who on the home front helped assemble B-24 bombers. One of our members had the privilege of es**rting them all on Wednesday during a flight to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the end of WWII.

Pictured in the first photo is our own legacy team member, Vincent J. Speranza, 95, along with Holocaust survivor Joshua Kaufman, 93. Mr. Kaufman lost his mother and siblings at Auschwitz before being transferred to Kaufering, a subcamp of Dachau. Vince, who served with the 101st Airborne Division, was one of the soldiers who liberated Kaufering. The two men had the opportunity to be together to celebrate the anniversary victory, liberation, and peace.

If you have a lump in your throat at seeing these two together, we do too.

Also, on board was Navy Veteran Donald Fosburg. On September 2, 1945, Donald celebrated his 19th birthday witnessing first hand the surrender of the Imperial Japanese aboard the battleship USS Missouri. Donald was a crew member. In one of the photos here he holds a flag given to him five years ago in recognition of the event. Wednesday, he celebrated his 94th birthday! Happy Birthday, Sir.

And, then there was a beautiful couple shown here, Bill Ridenour and Betty his wife. While he was serving in the infantry, Betty was on the home front driving rivets in B-24 aircraft—some of which likely came through our facility at Frederick Army Airfield where pilots trained during the war.

We were given the privilege of helping to es**rt these four members of our Greatest Generation and ensuring their general health and safety. Seen in the last photo to the right facing the camera is our team member and head of our West Coast operations, Brian Wiswell, an EMT and former Fire Chief, now a Jump Master in training on our team.

The three vintage troop carrier aircraft that participated were Commemorative Air Force's D Day Doll, Gooney Bird Group - Betsy’s Biscuit Bomber, and Civil Air Transport. They flew a flight pattern over the Long Beach, California, area that went over U.S. Marine Corps Base El Torro ,the Pacific Battleship Center - Battleship USS Iowa, the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, and the The Queen Mary which was used to transport troops during WWII.

These photos go to show how blessed we are in what we get to share with all of you. The events of 2020 put a damper on many of the 75th Anniversary activities. But relentlessly, people have said, “Nuts!” They’ve found ways to power through.

We extend our sincerest thanks to the flight crews and organizers who extended the opportunity for us to participate. To our Veterans, we render our salute and extend to you both our respect and our love. You are our national treasure, and we will never forget the gifts you’ve imparted to us.

All The Way!

Photos by Brandon Richardson, Long Beach Post, Keith BIrmingham, Whittier Daily News, Rafael CA on Flickr, and Brian Wiswell.

True this Gas/Gas/Gas
08/30/2020

True this Gas/Gas/Gas

SIERRA HOTEL AERONAUTICS
08/17/2020

SIERRA HOTEL AERONAUTICS

On this day in aviation history; August 16, 1960, Colonel Joseph William Kittinger II stepped away from his open gondola named "Excelsior" tethered to a massive helium balloon from an unbelievable altitude of 102,800 feet (31,300 m) above the surface of our Earth.

The atmospheric pressure so low, that during the accent, Joe's pressurization in his right glove malfunctioned, and his right hand swelled to twice its normal size.

Taking that one giant step, Joe free fell for 4 minutes and 36 seconds, slamming into the thicker atmosphere below at speeds up to 614 miles per hour (988 km/h) before opening his parachute at 18,000 feet (5,500 m).

Joe's pressurization for his right glove malfunctioned during the ascent and his right hand swelled to twice its normal size.

Joseph William Kittinger II was decorated with a second Distinguished Flying Cross, and awarded the Harmon Trophy by President Dwight D. Eisenhower

Kittinger later served three combat tours of duty during the Vietnam War, flying a total of 483 combat missions.

May 11, 1972, just before the end of his third tour of duty. While flying an F-4D. Kittinger and his wingman were chasing a MiG-21 when Kittinger's Phantom II was hit by an air-to-air missile from another MiG-21 that damaged the Phantom's starboard wing and set the aircraft on fire. Kittinger and 1st Lieutenant William J. Reich ejected a few miles from Thai Nguyen and were soon captured and taken to the city of Hanoi.

Kittinger and Reich spent 11 months as prisoners of war (POWs) in the Hỏa Lò Prison, the so-called "Hanoi Hilton"
Sierrahotel.net

08/06/2020
Dan Bongino

Dan Bongino

Ronald Reagan could literally give this exact speech to today's Democrats. This is a MUST-WATCH.

Old Canada Series
06/08/2020

Old Canada Series

76 years ago today, June 6, 1944, James M. Doohan of Vancouver, led D Company of Royal Winnipeg Rifles ashore at Juno beach. He would be shot 6 times, survive and go on to become Scotty on Star Trek.

Chris Granger Photography
06/06/2020

Chris Granger Photography

Seventy six years ago today brothers Ubert Terrell, 100, right, and L.C. Terrell, 98, were both invading Normandy on D-Day, one on the ground and the other by air. L.C. took out two enemy machine gun nests with hand gr***des that day. He knew he could throw accurately because he'd spent a lot of time catching and throwing balls with a minor league baseball player he'd known before the war. He successfully lobbed a gr***de into the nest, but only after crawling up the beach on his belly. Ubert, who was fluent in Cajun French, Spanish, and Italian, carried out five covert missions to gather intelligence for D-Day by parachuting into occupied France by night and meeting up with members of the French underground. That’s in addition to him flying over Normandy to help deliver paratroopers onto the battlefield. Not bad for two country boys from Louisiana. Photo by Chris Granger https://www.nola.com/news/northshore/article_17eac652-a6ac-11ea-8385-7faf9b43a92f.html

17 Rare Pics Reveal A Fake Rooftop Town Built To Hide Boeing’s Factory From Japanese Air Strikes
05/20/2020
17 Rare Pics Reveal A Fake Rooftop Town Built To Hide Boeing’s Factory From Japanese Air Strikes

17 Rare Pics Reveal A Fake Rooftop Town Built To Hide Boeing’s Factory From Japanese Air Strikes

During World War 2, one B-17 Bomber cost a little over $200,000 to produce. That's about $3,4 million in today's economy. And since the US Army requested thousands of these planes, they wanted to take every measure when securing the Boeing factory that produced them. And by every measure I mean hiri...

Heartland Militaria Show
05/06/2020

Heartland Militaria Show

I would like to share with you all my cousin Dwight Fisk Roberts of Kansas he was a fireman station on the USS Arizona that perished on that fateful day of Dec 7th 1941

Special Forces Association Chapter LX
04/24/2020

Special Forces Association Chapter LX

On this day in U.S. Army SF history......24 April 1969: Jerry “Mad Dog” Shriver goes MIA in Laos.

He was born on September 24, 1941, in De Funiak Springs, a small resort town in Florida. Little is known about Shriver’s childhood and his story starts when he joined the Army at a young age.

He arrived in Vietnam in 1966, having risen to the rank of Sergeant First Class. He ended up leading a platoon in the 5th Special Forces with MACV-SOG (Military Assistance Command, Vietnam Studies and Observation Group) who were an unconventional task force assigned to carry out top-secret missions throughout the South-East Asian theater during the Vietnam war.

The team’s main role was to perform deep pe*******on missions behind enemy lines and then carry out very hazardous strategic reconnaissance and interdiction duties.

A lot of what Shriver did with MACV-SOG may never be known as they were highly classified missions, often in countries that they should not have been in. But the decorations he was awarded were a reflection of his bravery and dedication to his duty and achievements.

He received two Silver Stars, three Army Commendation Medals for Valor, seven Bronze Stars, one Purple Heart, one Air Medal, and the Soldier’s Medal during his short life.

Such was his reputation that “Hanoi Hanna” gave him his nickname of “Mad Dog” and the North Vietnamese government seemed so afraid of him that they even offered a bounty of $10,000 (equivalent to $70,000 in 2018) if someone was to kill him.

Medal of Honour winner, Lieutenant Jim Flemming, who had served with Shriver on several missions, summed him up as “The quintessential warrior loner.”

---Mud

Thank you for your service prayers for the familyhttps://www.facebook.com/1691341771006988/posts/3106021642872320/?d=n
04/22/2020

Thank you for your service prayers for the family

https://www.facebook.com/1691341771006988/posts/3106021642872320/?d=n

On behalf of the Historical Society for Southeast New Mexico we ask for a "moment of silence" to pay tribute to Jack Lin Chew who faithfully served his country, his community and his patrons. Photos courtesy of the Chew Family.

ASMIC
04/17/2020
ASMIC

ASMIC

Membership is an investment.  As the values of insignia have risen, so, too, has the proliferation of reproductions and fakes.  One can surf online auction sites on any given day and find collectors who are making foolish decisions because of a lack knowledge and expertise.  Membership in ASMIC p...

03/16/2020

Our next shows in Sulphur, Oklahoma march 21-22 and Taos, New Mexico March 28-29 have been forced to cancel due to the coronavirus scare. Stay tuned for when we will have these two shows back on the books at a later date.

A Complete List of Every Black Medal of Honor Recipient in U.S. History
03/09/2020
A Complete List of Every Black Medal of Honor Recipient in U.S. History

A Complete List of Every Black Medal of Honor Recipient in U.S. History

During the month of February, we pay tribute to historic contributions made by African Americans. Throughout the history of the United States, racism and segregation were motivating factors for not properly recognizing worthy people for the merits they deserved. To this day, medals of valor are upgr...

02/27/2020

2020 Show dates

Sulphur March 21-22

Altus payday weekend for military June 13-14

Chickasha is Sept 19-20

Guymon is Sept 26-27

Thanks Matt

Meet the gallant all-black American female battalion that served in Europe during World War II - Face2Face Africa
02/11/2020
Meet the gallant all-black American female battalion that served in Europe during World War II - Face2Face Africa

Meet the gallant all-black American female battalion that served in Europe during World War II - Face2Face Africa

The first time American women fought in a war was during the American Civil War. Women were not allowed to be selected into the draft, so they disguised themselves as men and fought instead. A few of them were only discovered to be women when found dead. American women were only allowed to serve in....

Strong man of faith for what he endured May he Rip
02/07/2020

Strong man of faith for what he endured May he Rip

AMERICA REMEMBERS -- It is with great sadness, we share the news that World War II veteran Superstar Mr. Joe Demler, who was featured in Life magazine as POW, dies at 94.

Joe Demler, whose harrowing World War II experience as a prisoner of war was featured in Life Magazine in 1945, and who went on to a long, rewarding life in Port Washington, died Wednesday night.

Demler was captured in December 1944 by the German army during the Battle of the Bulge. When he was liberated more than four months later, he had lost 90 pounds from his 5-foot-7, 160-pound frame.

A photo of a skeletal Demler appeared in a 1945 Life magazine article after his POW camp was liberated.

Demler recalled in a 2015 Milwaukee Journal Sentinel article how he and other POWs were forced to march many miles during the cold winter of 1944-’45 and repair railroad tracks while being bombed and strafed by Allied planes.

Prisoners had “no control over your destiny to know what’s going to happen to you," Demler said at the time. "You don’t know what to expect. At one time the talk was (Adolf) Hi**er was going to kill all of us,” he said.

What helped Demler cope was meeting other prisoners of war captured after him who brought heartening news of Allied troops moving steadily toward Berlin, he said. Demler knew he only had to hold out a little longer.

“You always look forward to living. That’s what kept you alive,” Demler said “You prayed and you thought positively all the time.”

Demler had turned 19 on Dec. 7, 1944, and his unit, K Company, 137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Infantry Division, was sent to fight in the Bulge the day after Christmas. He attended Christmas services outdoors as a chaplain stood on a jeep hood for Mass, Demler's thoughts drifting to his family and friends home in Port Washington celebrating the holiday.

While the Germans proved to be a formidable foe, soldiers also fought brutal cold and heavy snow.

Demler had only his clothing, rifle and ammunition.

"We were moving, but the weather was so bad," he said in 2015. "The snow was up to your hips. It was the coldest winter in Europe. I'm glad I had my overcoat."

Demler used his overcoat as a blanket, sleeping on floors of buildings captured from the Germans.

For Demler, the Battle of the Bulge came to an end on the night of Jan. 4 when a German Panzer IV tank fired a shot through a stone building where he was acting as a lookout on the second floor. The impact launched Demler from the floor into the ceiling. Two companies of American soldiers, more than 300 including Demler, were captured, interrogated and packed into train cars to a prisoner of war camp.

The Germans took Demler's weapon, ammunition and rations. His overcoat, the one thing that had kept him alive during the bitter cold, was burned at his POW camp because of lice.

Each day 10 men shared one pound of cheese and a loaf of German rye bread made mostly of sawdust. Demler rapidly lost weight. As more American POWs arrived, Demler learned the war would likely end soon. On the day he was liberated in April 1945, Demler weighed only 70 pounds.

A Life photographer embedded with liberation troops snapped Demler's photo, published a short time later in the popular magazine. Doctors estimated he would have likely died within three days had the war not ended when it did.

Despite Demler's emaciated condition, he was one of the lucky ones. American casualties during the five-week Battle of the Bulge numbered almost 90,000, including 19,000 killed.

It took Demler months to regain his strength before he returned home to Port Washington, where he worked at the post office for 37 years, rising to assistant postmaster before retiring in 1982. He raised three children with his wife, Therese.

"You can't have a defeated attitude. That's why I'm alive," said Demler, who never returned to Germany. "Every day I think about it. It never goes away."

"Every Day is Memorial Day"
The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation
Web: wwwTGGF.org

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Blanchard, OK
73010

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Matt and Pattie Hindi are the official promoters for Badshot Shows. I conduct my shows currently in following locations: Grady County fairgrounds, Chickasha, OK. National Guard Armory, Ponca City, Ok. Logan County Fairgrounds, Guthrie, OK. Murray County Fairgrounds, Sulphur, OK. Texas County Fairgrounds, Guymon, OK. McCurtain County Fairgrounds, Idabel, OK. Washington County Fairgrounds, Dewey, Ok.

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Holy smokes this FB page is quiet as a mouse 🤫