DamnCancer

DamnCancer Neuroendocrine Small Cell Cervical Cancer - About 1 in 1.6 Million women in the U.S. will be diagnosed with this rare and aggressive cancer each year.
(1)

Operating as usual

Thank you all for supporting Damncancer and Amy.  This page will be heavily modified and not be related to this rare can...
07/31/2018
Home - Necervix

Thank you all for supporting Damncancer and Amy. This page will be heavily modified and not be related to this rare cancer at all. Please visit www.necervix.com to support these brave women.

Thank you,
Michael

Connect with us on Registry Learn more about our international cancer registry for women affected by neuroendocrine cervical cancer. More Support Group Hear about all the activities of the Small & Large Cell Sisterhood More Information Read about current literature for the treatment of neuroendocrin...

DamnCancer's cover photo
04/09/2016

DamnCancer's cover photo

04/09/2016

Hi Everybody. We have some changes coming on our mission. We are working on a more grassroots style campaign. We have come to the decision that we wish to help on a different level. Look for an update soon. Thanks!

I think its time to give away some Money! (YEP YOU READ THAT RIGHT!)I made a very special playlist for my wife Amy Still...
09/04/2015
Hearts, Desires & Disorders

I think its time to give away some Money! (YEP YOU READ THAT RIGHT!)

I made a very special playlist for my wife Amy Stills as a gift of expression of my life, our life, our love and what it will feel like if I lose her to this aggressive cancer that she is fighting and hopefully will WIN!

Since September is Gynecological Cancer Awareness Month, I am in the mood to donate some cash to the MD Anderson Cancer Hospital - Small and Large Cell Cervical Cancer Sisterhood's Fundraiser Account, so check this out!

If you like this post, I will donate a $1.00
If you are a listen to the playlist on MixCloud, I will donate $2.00
If you like Facebook/damncancer, I will donate $2.50
If you follow us on Mixcloud, I will donate $3.00
If you share this, I will donate $3.50

This mix is currently #85 on Mixcloud Alternative, lets push it to the top 10.

So you get to listen to music (with more mixed to come) and click some buttons, I will make donation total of $12.00 :) *

*Up to $2500 since we're not independently wealthy!

If you want to donate direct any amount helps you can at https://www.crowdrise.com/100for100annualcampa/fundraiser/damncancer or direct through https://www.damncancer.com

Thank you Michael & Amy

----------

Here is the track list - Some songs are explicit to note!

Cecilia and the Satellite - Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness
Blame (feat. John Newman) - Calvin Harris
Hey Mama (feat. Nicki Minaj, Bebe Rexha & Afrojack) - David Guetta
Beautiful Now (feat. Jon Bellion) - Zedd
Lean On (feat. MØ & DJ Snake) - Major Lazer
Love the Way You Lie (feat. Rihanna) - Eminem
See You Again (feat. Charlie Puth) - Wiz Khalifa Furious 7
The Heart Wants What It Wants - Selena Gomez
Bad Blood (feat. Kendrick Lamar) - Taylor Swift
Stole the Show (feat. Parson James) - Kygo
Shotgun (feat. Rochelle) - Yellow Claw
Not Afraid - Eminem
Rio - Netsky
Soap - Melanie Martinez
Like a River Runs (Jack's 2015 Rework) - Bleachers
Up in Flames - Ruelle
Pocketful of Sunshine - Natasha Bedingfield
Under the Influence - Elle King
Something's Gotta Give - All Time Low
Take Me to Church - Hozier
Trap - Elizaveta
Cancer - My Chemical Romance
Believe - Mumford & Sons
Can't Feel My Face - The Weeknd
Centuries - Fall Out Boy
All I Need- Within Temptation
Hold On, We're Going Home (feat. Majid Jordan) - Drake
Like a River Runs - Sia Like a River Runs
Hurt - Johnny Cash
The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face - Roberta Flack

This mix was created for my wife that has a very rare and high-grade cancer and the odds of survival due to the prognosis is sadly poor. I poured my heart into this mix and hope you enjoy it. A friend of ours listened to the mix and to quote - "What a ride this mix takes the listener on." My wife su…

07/31/2015
MMA Nuts

Fight Like A Girl! - Fight Like A Girl! - Fight Like A Girl!

Ronda Rousey says her mom taught her to not be a "Do Nothing Bitch". It may be crass on the surface but the lesson is there...Respect!

Amy lost one of her cancer sisterhood friends, Imee Vallejo Raymundo a few days ago. From what Amy told me she was a won...
07/31/2015

Amy lost one of her cancer sisterhood friends, Imee Vallejo Raymundo a few days ago. From what Amy told me she was a wonderful and beautiful person!
Amy and her friend Cristi-Ray Vernon will be running the Hollywood Half Marathon & 5K / 10K 2014 this Saturday in honor of Imee and the other women that have lost their battle. The picture in this post is about 2 months old to note, she was only 26. #damncancer.

Amy lost one of her cancer sisterhood friends, Imee Vallejo Raymundo a few days ago. From what Amy told me she was a won...
07/31/2015

Amy lost one of her cancer sisterhood friends, Imee Vallejo Raymundo a few days ago. From what Amy told me she was a wonderful and beautiful person!
Amy and her friend Cristi-Ray Vernon will be running the Hollywood Half Marathon & 5K / 10K 2014 this Saturday in honor of Imee and the other women that have lost their battle. The picture in this post is about 2 months old to note, she was only 26. #damncancer.

We thought we would post the entire open letter to Lesley Jenson here on Facebook.How Dare you, but I Forgive you!Dear L...
07/31/2015
Utah mom faked terminal cancer for chairt funds: cops

We thought we would post the entire open letter to Lesley Jenson here on Facebook.

How Dare you, but I Forgive you!

Dear Lesley,

I was heartbroken when I heard that you, like me, were suffering from a rare and aggressive cancer. My thoughts immediately went to your beautiful 6 year old daughter, who I know is the light of your life. I remembered the conversation we had when I first met you a year and a half ago - right before my life shattering diagnosis and long before the current ugliness began. You were so happy that day! A small group of us sat in our mutual friend's living room, talking about life. We had one of those deep conversations about the universe being in balance, about seeking out the positive - exactly the kind of discussion that takes place with friends whose champagne brunch has turned into an all-day event. I was visiting from out of town, but I immediately felt at home with you and our mutual friend's other friends. We connected, and after that day, you were also my friend.

A week after we met, I learned I had cancer. The diagnosis - high grade neuroendocrine carcinoma, also called Small Cell Cervical Cancer based on the tumor location - was brutal. The disease is very rare, with an unknown cause and limited information about treatment options, but also deadly, with survival rates below 20%. I was very private about it at first, but I slowly began to acknowledge the disease to family and close friends. Our mutual friend in your town asked if she could share the news with her circle of friends, which included you. I agreed, and the outpouring of support via Facebook and through care packages I received in the mail was touching. These gestures were very meaningful to me as I recovered from major surgery, and then as I completed 28 sessions of radiation. I was encouraged by your kind words as I endured 6 rounds of extremely aggressive chemotherapy, where I was forced to embrace my baldness while trying not to lose my sense of myself as a wife, professional and marathon runner. You were part of a larger cast that kept me going. It was tough, but I finished treatment in December of 2013 and went on to live my life in remission, hoping like hell that I'd be an exception to the rule that this beast would not come back and kill me.

In June of 2014, I made it back to Logan for another visit, happy to still be in remission. Our friend held a party in my honor, and I got to see you again. It was wonderful to reconnect with the people who had made such an impact on me when I'd met them the year before. You and I had some time to visit one on one, and I remember how complimentary you were about how I'd handled my health challenges. You went on and on about how brave I was, how much strength it must have taken to keep going, to not just curl up in a fetal position and give up. I told you what I always say in this scenario: I wasn't given a choice, so I HAD to keep going, for myself but more importantly for my loved ones. You said you could never handle something like this, but I told you that wasn't true. Your daughter was playing with her friends nearby while we were talking, and I asked how you handle being sick when you need to take care of her. You told me that you just do what is needed for her, since she comes first. I told you that you'd do exactly what I'd done in my circumstances - you would do what you had to do, you'd get through it, and you'd do it for her. Our conversation made me feel good, and I felt like maybe my cancer could have inspired you in some way. I'm not a big believer that "everything happens for a reason," but for those few minutes, you made me feel like my terrible experience could have a positive impact on others.

For the second year in a row, I got bad news right after visiting Logan. My cancer was back, this time with a metastatic tumor in the liver (which multiplied into 4 new tumors within weeks), which meant I was now officially Stage IV. My fight resumed - more surgery, followed by an experimental targeted drug therapy that produces side effects that make me consistently sicker than my 6 months of chemo hell. Then last month, I got a tearful call from our mutual friend in Logan: you were diagnosed with Stage IV cancer, also rare and deadly, just like me. Our conversation from June echoed in my head. I had told you to put yourself in my shoes, and here you were. I was heartbroken, for you and especially your daughter. I told our friend to let you know you could call me if you wanted to talk. I didn't reach out to you, as I understood that everyone reacts to a cancer diagnosis differently, and that you'd let me know if I could help you. But I was ready to help, and my heart went out to you. I was grateful to see the community support you received after going public. Raising awareness of rare diseases, especially aggressive ones that threaten women in their prime, is a cause that is very personal to me! When I saw your television interview in which you said some of the same words I'd spoken to you in June, I felt as though perhaps sharing my experience with you then was in some way helping you cope now.

Now I've heard the news that you do not have cancer, and that you made it all up to steal money, and possibly to get sympathy. First and foremost, I am thrilled at this news. I am beyond relieved that you, a beautiful and smart 26 year old woman, are not dying what would be an excruciatingly painful and premature death. Your child will grow up with the chance to know you, and she will forgive you. I personally know 6 women with my disease, the oldest of whom was 45 and the youngest who was 26, like you, who died in the last 9 months. Their children, partners, parents and friends are devastated by their loss, and they would give anything to trade having to deal with the fallout from your crime with the finality of early death in a nanosecond. You will make it through this, as painful and hopeless as it may seem now. Be grateful for that chance. Your cry for help has been heard, and I hope you will get the help you need, even as you are paying the legal consequences of your actions.

As a cancer patient who struggles daily with the uncertainty of whether this will be my last Christmas, whether I will live to celebrate my 40th birthday in January of 2016, whether I will ever feel "normal" again, I should feel angry about what you're alleged to have done. I feel as though my painful experience did inspire you, though not in any remotely positive way, and I am shocked and saddened by it. I do not wish to persecute you though; if anything, I want you to know how much I hurt for you. Surely you did not think about the damage you would be causing. I do not believe you realized that preying on the goodwill of friends and strangers ultimately steals from those who are dying and desperately need help. My 6 friends who died this year? They might have been saved if they could have had their tumors genetically tested in order to find targeted drugs to save them. The test costs about $1000, and if you really stole over $17,000, then that money might have saved 17 women just like you, including 26-year old Jade, a mother of three, and 26-year old Imee, a single mother of 6-year old Brandon, or another single mother, Melissa, whose son Talon is also now an orphan. You didn't mean to do harm to them, but this is the real human cost of faking a serious illness. I forgive you and only want you to understand the enormity of this crime. Maybe your experience will inspire someone who might consider perpetrating such a fraud to think about the toll it takes, not just on the perpetrator but also on those who are truly suffering.

With Sadness and Compassion,

Amy

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/utah-mom-faked-terminal-cancer-chairt-funds-cops-article-1.2034959

A Utah mom faked terminal cancer in order to rake in thousands in charity dollars, police said.

My wonderful strong wife Amy Stills is running the TCS New York City Marathon with Sharon Mall Osterholt this coming Sun...
07/31/2015

My wonderful strong wife Amy Stills is running the TCS New York City Marathon with Sharon Mall Osterholt this coming Sunday. Amy & Sharon were picked also to represent the USA in the opening ceremony of the Marathon. How cool!

I am always amazed by the strength that my wife shows through such scary
unsure times and especially due to the fact that her new cutting edge
treatment to help control her cancer made it so she could hardly walk a few
weeks ago from the side effects.

Now on a 10-day reprieve from the treatment, she is squeezing every
precious moment she can to live life to its fullest (as we all should).

So at Stage IV with an aggressive rare cancer, multiple high grade
neuroendocrine active tumors in her liver (hitch hiking a scenic route
through NY) and other lingering side effects and she still kicks ass! This
is part of the grand determination and strength of what I love so much about
you Amy!

damncancer.com

DamnCancer was born out of love, and a commitment to honor the women who fight this damned disease Neuroendocrine Small ...
07/31/2015
DamnCancer - Neuroendocrine Small Cell Cervical Cancer

DamnCancer was born out of love, and a commitment to honor the women who fight this damned disease Neuroendocrine Small Cell Cervical Cancer everyday, as well as the many women who have lost their battle along the journey.

What we have come to know is that cancer fighters are some of the strongest people in the world.

www.damncancer.com

Share to Care - Dare to Share - Rare but There

#damncancer

Neuroendocrine Small Cell Cervical Cancer

LA Marathon 2014
07/31/2015

LA Marathon 2014

LA Marathon 2014
07/31/2015

LA Marathon 2014

6 months of cancer hell - 3 surgeries, 23 nights in the hospital, 28 radiation sessions, 168 hours of chemo >>> Exactly ...
07/31/2015

6 months of cancer hell - 3 surgeries, 23 nights in the hospital, 28 radiation sessions, 168 hours of chemo >>> Exactly 100 Days later = 26.2 Miles. LA Marathon, Baby!!!
#sheinspiresme

6 months of cancer hell - 3 surgeries, 23 nights in the hospital, 28 radiation sessions, 168 hours of chemo >>> Exactly ...
07/31/2015

6 months of cancer hell - 3 surgeries, 23 nights in the hospital, 28 radiation sessions, 168 hours of chemo >>> Exactly 100 Days later = 26.2 Miles. LA Marathon, Baby!!!
#sheinspiresme

Amy hanging with Professional Runner and Olympian, Deena Kastor at LA Marathon Expo 2014.
07/31/2015

Amy hanging with Professional Runner and Olympian, Deena Kastor at LA Marathon Expo 2014.

Amy hanging with Professional Runner and Olympian, Deena Kastor at LA Marathon Expo 2014.
07/31/2015

Amy hanging with Professional Runner and Olympian, Deena Kastor at LA Marathon Expo 2014.

Hi everyone! Over the past six months or so, I have had a lot of messages from friends & online buddies on Facebook, ema...
07/31/2015

Hi everyone! Over the past six months or so, I have had a lot of messages from friends & online buddies on Facebook, email etc.. Asking "Hey how is everything?", "Hey, you guys finally having kids?" Well this is what is happening, and I really want to thank the few people that knew and kept it private until we were ready to respond and say "This is what is happening!"

They say a picture tells a thousand words, but in this case, I thought I should add some words. Please share, tweet, retweet, come cheer on Amy at the LA Marathon, we would really appreciate it! I hope you find this inspirational.

* This is what is happening! *

In May of 2013, my 37-year old wife was diagnosed with cervical cancer. We were told that it had been caught early, and that after surgery and possible radiation, we'd be able to get on with our lives. The prognosis was excellent, with 5-year survival rates at 90% or higher. But surgery only told us it was worse - much worse - than the doctors initially thought.

On July 3, we found out she had a very rare, very aggressive cancer called High Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma. Only about 100 women in the U.S. are diagnosed with it annually, and the prognosis is extremely poor. There isn't much data available, but studies have shown Stage 3 survival rates between 9-23%. Between July and December, she endured 28 sessions of radiation, six sessions of very strong chemotherapy (each lasting a minimum of 28 hours over 4 days) and several overnight visits to Cedars Sinai to deal with the treatment effects. It was brutal, but her scans in mid-December were all clear. And on Sunday, exactly 100 days after being released from the hospital after her last round of chemo, she's running the LA Marathon for the first time. She already completed a half marathon - Surf City in Huntington Beach - just 66 days after treatment.

She's in remission now and focused on living life to its fullest. This cancer has a strong likelihood of recurrence, but if she makes it past the two-year mark, her survival odds increase considerably. I can't wait to see how she'll want to celebrate her 40th birthday (in January of 2016) if a marathon was on her short list after finishing cancer treatment!

Note:
Conventional wisdom about cervical cancer says that it is preventable (the HPV vaccine), slow moving, detectable with routine screening and fairly easy to treat. This is true for most cervical cancers, but not my wife's. The cause of neuroendocrine tumors is unknown, and there is not a standard treatment protocol. There is no known link between HPV and high grade neuroendocrine cervical cancer, and it does not always show up on a Pap test. In fact, there are barely any symptoms, and the disease may be advanced by the time this quickly moving cancer even whispers its presence.

Our message to women? To prevent and detect most forms of cervical cancer, get your daughters vaccinated against HPV and get your regular Pap tests, but don't stop there since not all cervical cancers are caused by HPV.

If your body tells you something might be going on, get it checked out. If she hadn't, my wife might not be alive today.

Please visit - www.damncancer.com for our story

@damncancer on twitter

Thank you!
Michael

Address

PO BOX 481232
Los Angeles, CA
90048

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when DamnCancer posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to DamnCancer:

Nearby event/venues


Other Performance & Event Venues in Los Angeles

Show All