Sag Harbor Whaling & Historical Museum

Sag Harbor Whaling & Historical Museum The Museum is dedicated to Sag Harbor's rich history as a prosperous whaling port. We house the largest collection of whaling equipment in New York State.
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We are now OPEN for the season! Thursday-Sunday, 10am - 4:30pm, with last entry at 4pm

For your safety, we are currently offering staggered entry (for parties up to 8) on the hour, twenty minutes after the hour, and forty minutes after the hour. Reservations are strongly recommended, and can be made by phone only up to one week in advance. Call us today at 631-725-0770. (walk in visitors also welcome, but those with reservations will have priority)

Operating as usual

[Ahoy!  Please Note: We're changing our format a bit, and posting items that coincide with the upcoming week rather than...
05/07/2021

[Ahoy! Please Note: We're changing our format a bit, and posting items that coincide with the upcoming week rather than the past week, so you have a chance to celebrate an event on its anniversary, rather than thinking "Gosh, I missed that..."]

THIS WEEK IN SAG HARBOR HISTORY
May 10, 1791
Reading is Fundamental!

Printer David Frothingham was just 25 years old when he moved to Sag Harbor, enticed in no small part by the exertions of several notable inhabitants - Customs Collector Henry P. Dering amongst them - to ensure his success. By the time he arrived, Dering and the others had secured about 350 subscribers for a new newspaper. The first issue of Frothingham's Long Island Herald came out on May 10, 1791. It was the first newspaper printed on all of Long Island.

With a customs house, newspaper and post office all established between 1789 and 1794, Sag Harbor was on its way to becoming the most important village on the east end.

Filled with local and foreign news, essays and a “poetry corner,” the paper came out weekly for seven years, ending its run in December 1798.

(Image via East Hampton Library)

[Ahoy! Please Note: We're changing our format a bit, and posting items that coincide with the upcoming week rather than the past week, so you have a chance to celebrate an event on its anniversary, rather than thinking "Gosh, I missed that..."]

THIS WEEK IN SAG HARBOR HISTORY
May 10, 1791
Reading is Fundamental!

Printer David Frothingham was just 25 years old when he moved to Sag Harbor, enticed in no small part by the exertions of several notable inhabitants - Customs Collector Henry P. Dering amongst them - to ensure his success. By the time he arrived, Dering and the others had secured about 350 subscribers for a new newspaper. The first issue of Frothingham's Long Island Herald came out on May 10, 1791. It was the first newspaper printed on all of Long Island.

With a customs house, newspaper and post office all established between 1789 and 1794, Sag Harbor was on its way to becoming the most important village on the east end.

Filled with local and foreign news, essays and a “poetry corner,” the paper came out weekly for seven years, ending its run in December 1798.

(Image via East Hampton Library)

NOW HEAR THIS:  WE WILL BE OPENING TOMORROW, MAY 1st Come visit your favorite museum and see our latest exhibit, "A Plea...
04/30/2021

NOW HEAR THIS: WE WILL BE OPENING TOMORROW, MAY 1st

Come visit your favorite museum and see our latest exhibit, "A Pleasure To The Eye" - some really fantastic photographs of Sag Harbor and the East End taken by William Wallace Tooker circa 1895. (Below: the foot of Long Wharf, looking up Division Street)

We'll be open Thursday-Sunday 10:00 - 4:30 (last entry 4pm). For your safety, we'll have staggered entry (for up to eight guests per party), with entry on the hour, twenty past the hour and forty past the hour.

Reservations (strongly suggested, and by phone only) can be made up to one week in advance. Call 631-725-0770. Walk up visitors welcome too (but those with reservations get priority)

(Photo by William Wallace Tooker from the Kevin J. McCann Collection. Shout out and thanks to Kevin!)

See you soon!

NOW HEAR THIS: WE WILL BE OPENING TOMORROW, MAY 1st

Come visit your favorite museum and see our latest exhibit, "A Pleasure To The Eye" - some really fantastic photographs of Sag Harbor and the East End taken by William Wallace Tooker circa 1895. (Below: the foot of Long Wharf, looking up Division Street)

We'll be open Thursday-Sunday 10:00 - 4:30 (last entry 4pm). For your safety, we'll have staggered entry (for up to eight guests per party), with entry on the hour, twenty past the hour and forty past the hour.

Reservations (strongly suggested, and by phone only) can be made up to one week in advance. Call 631-725-0770. Walk up visitors welcome too (but those with reservations get priority)

(Photo by William Wallace Tooker from the Kevin J. McCann Collection. Shout out and thanks to Kevin!)

See you soon!

THIS WEEK IN SAG HARBOR HISTORYApril 15th, 1861Extra! Extra! Read All About It!Before high-speed presses were invented, ...
04/23/2021

THIS WEEK IN SAG HARBOR HISTORY
April 15th, 1861
Extra! Extra! Read All About It!

Before high-speed presses were invented, printing a newspaper was a laborious business, with the pages of type having to be set by hand and then run through the press page by page - also by hand. This took time, so the printing process of an issue of the paper would have to begin two or three days before it actually came out, which made including late breaking news items almost impossible. To get such news out to their readers, newspapers relied on “Extras” (as in “extra edition”). It was typically just a single small sheet, but it was fast and easy to print so the news could get out as soon as possible - the “tweet” of its day.

Here’s an example of an Extra from the Sag Harbor Express, a weekly paper that came out each Saturday. The attack on Fort Sumter began in the early hours of Friday April 12th, 1861 and the fort surrendered the next day. Word of the attack probably didn’t
reach Long Island (via the New York City papers) until Sunday. Rather than wait a week for its next regular issue (when the attack would be “old news”), The Express issued an Extra on Monday April 15th to let its readers know war had begun.

(This wonderful piece of Sag Harbor history is on permanent display at the Museum. We open May 1st – come and down and have a look!)

THIS WEEK IN SAG HARBOR HISTORY
April 15th, 1861
Extra! Extra! Read All About It!

Before high-speed presses were invented, printing a newspaper was a laborious business, with the pages of type having to be set by hand and then run through the press page by page - also by hand. This took time, so the printing process of an issue of the paper would have to begin two or three days before it actually came out, which made including late breaking news items almost impossible. To get such news out to their readers, newspapers relied on “Extras” (as in “extra edition”). It was typically just a single small sheet, but it was fast and easy to print so the news could get out as soon as possible - the “tweet” of its day.

Here’s an example of an Extra from the Sag Harbor Express, a weekly paper that came out each Saturday. The attack on Fort Sumter began in the early hours of Friday April 12th, 1861 and the fort surrendered the next day. Word of the attack probably didn’t
reach Long Island (via the New York City papers) until Sunday. Rather than wait a week for its next regular issue (when the attack would be “old news”), The Express issued an Extra on Monday April 15th to let its readers know war had begun.

(This wonderful piece of Sag Harbor history is on permanent display at the Museum. We open May 1st – come and down and have a look!)

THIS WEEK IN SAG HARBOR HISTORYApril 11, 1850Theft! Arson! Skullduggery!At about 11 o’clock at night, a man knocked furi...
04/16/2021

THIS WEEK IN SAG HARBOR HISTORY
April 11, 1850
Theft! Arson! Skullduggery!

At about 11 o’clock at night, a man knocked furiously on the front door of John C. King, a Sag Harbor merchant. The man warned King he had just passed his store “up by the bridge” and saw a light coming from the cellar, and heard an ominous “crackling” sound. King rushed down to his shop to find the cellar doors wide open - and the whole building on fire. He braved the flames try to save the most valuable merchandise in the show case, but the flames were too intense. All was lost. The next day, picking through the ruins, King discovered that while a set of Britannia metal spoons in the showcase were melted together, there was no sign of an expensive watch that had sat next to the spoons. It was assumed someone had secreted themselves in the cellar and waited until King left for the day to commit his theft - and then arson in hopes of covering his tracks.

King’s business was effectively ruined. He sold off his stock in a (literal) fire sale some months later, and seems to have then gone into the hotel trade.

But what of the stranger who warned him? Clearly the man was unknown to King, yet he knew where King lived. Could it be that he was in fact the thief, so brazen that he stole a watch, set fire to the store, and then had the audacity to warn King? We will never know…

THIS WEEK IN SAG HARBOR HISTORY
April 11, 1850
Theft! Arson! Skullduggery!

At about 11 o’clock at night, a man knocked furiously on the front door of John C. King, a Sag Harbor merchant. The man warned King he had just passed his store “up by the bridge” and saw a light coming from the cellar, and heard an ominous “crackling” sound. King rushed down to his shop to find the cellar doors wide open - and the whole building on fire. He braved the flames try to save the most valuable merchandise in the show case, but the flames were too intense. All was lost. The next day, picking through the ruins, King discovered that while a set of Britannia metal spoons in the showcase were melted together, there was no sign of an expensive watch that had sat next to the spoons. It was assumed someone had secreted themselves in the cellar and waited until King left for the day to commit his theft - and then arson in hopes of covering his tracks.

King’s business was effectively ruined. He sold off his stock in a (literal) fire sale some months later, and seems to have then gone into the hotel trade.

But what of the stranger who warned him? Clearly the man was unknown to King, yet he knew where King lived. Could it be that he was in fact the thief, so brazen that he stole a watch, set fire to the store, and then had the audacity to warn King? We will never know…

THIS WEEK IN SAG HARBOR HISTORY  April 7, 1761Try-works at Sag Harbor approvedOn this date Nathan Fordham Jr. and James ...
04/09/2021

THIS WEEK IN SAG HARBOR HISTORY
April 7, 1761
Try-works at Sag Harbor approved

On this date Nathan Fordham Jr. and James Foster received permission from the Town of Southampton to build a wharf and try-works at Sag Harbor. A “try-works” is a set of large iron pots on top of a brick furnace, used to boil whale blubber down into oil. The Town did add a caveat however: it reserved the “privilege of landing their whale upon said wharf at all times” to be tried out “on reasonable terms.” The wharf and works were located somewhere near the foot of modern Main Street.

This is about the same time that the earliest records indicate whaling voyages were being made out of Sag Harbor, so it is likely the try-works and wharf were built to service these ships. It also indicates that the early Sag Harbor whalers were bringing home barrels of blubber, not oil. (This was the common practice of British whalers in the Arctic at the time) But the industry was changing; try-works were soon being put on the ships themselves, allowing them to stay out at sea for much longer periods. Sag Harbor whalers are known to have had try-works on board by the 1780s.

Pictured: Try-works at Amagansett, from Harper’s Magazine (1897)

THIS WEEK IN SAG HARBOR HISTORY
April 7, 1761
Try-works at Sag Harbor approved

On this date Nathan Fordham Jr. and James Foster received permission from the Town of Southampton to build a wharf and try-works at Sag Harbor. A “try-works” is a set of large iron pots on top of a brick furnace, used to boil whale blubber down into oil. The Town did add a caveat however: it reserved the “privilege of landing their whale upon said wharf at all times” to be tried out “on reasonable terms.” The wharf and works were located somewhere near the foot of modern Main Street.

This is about the same time that the earliest records indicate whaling voyages were being made out of Sag Harbor, so it is likely the try-works and wharf were built to service these ships. It also indicates that the early Sag Harbor whalers were bringing home barrels of blubber, not oil. (This was the common practice of British whalers in the Arctic at the time) But the industry was changing; try-works were soon being put on the ships themselves, allowing them to stay out at sea for much longer periods. Sag Harbor whalers are known to have had try-works on board by the 1780s.

Pictured: Try-works at Amagansett, from Harper’s Magazine (1897)

AHOY THERE!  Prepare To Make Sail!!!We will be OPENING MAY 1st with "A Pleasure To The Eye," a fantastic exhibition of p...
04/03/2021

AHOY THERE! Prepare To Make Sail!!!

We will be OPENING MAY 1st with "A Pleasure To The Eye," a fantastic exhibition of photographs of Sag Harbor and the East End taken by William Wallace Tooker circa 1895. See Sag Harbor as you've never seen it before! (Below: Main Street in the snow)

We'll be open starting Saturday May 1st, and be open Thursday-Sunday 10:00 - 4:30 (last entry 4pm). For your safety, we'll have staggered entry (for up to eight guests per party), with entry on the hour, twenty past the hour and forty past the hour.

Reservations (strongly suggested, and by phone only) can be made up to one week in advance. Call 631-725-0770.

We'll see you soon!

AHOY THERE! Prepare To Make Sail!!!

We will be OPENING MAY 1st with "A Pleasure To The Eye," a fantastic exhibition of photographs of Sag Harbor and the East End taken by William Wallace Tooker circa 1895. See Sag Harbor as you've never seen it before! (Below: Main Street in the snow)

We'll be open starting Saturday May 1st, and be open Thursday-Sunday 10:00 - 4:30 (last entry 4pm). For your safety, we'll have staggered entry (for up to eight guests per party), with entry on the hour, twenty past the hour and forty past the hour.

Reservations (strongly suggested, and by phone only) can be made up to one week in advance. Call 631-725-0770.

We'll see you soon!

Well, the votes are in:  Sag Harbor has been ranked 18th in the "Top 50 Best Coastal Towns" in the United States by bigs...
02/26/2021
50 Best Coastal Towns in the United States – Big 7 Travel

Well, the votes are in: Sag Harbor has been ranked 18th in the "Top 50 Best Coastal Towns" in the United States by bigseventravel.com, beating out such places as Paia HI, Mystic CT, Provincetown MA and Montauk.

We can't help but notice the highlights of the village they mention in their write-up: "...known for its old-timey feel and fascinating local stories. Browse the countless independent shops, hit up the beach, or tour the Sag Harbor Whaling & Historical Museum."

We agree!😊

We're busy here in the off-season planning our upcoming seasons events and exhibits. Stay tuned for more information as we get closer to our May 1st opening!

https://bigseventravel.com/best-coastal-towns-united-states/

Grab your favourite beachwear and a good book; these are the best coastal towns in the United States from East to Gulf to West.

You know we had to!
01/24/2021

You know we had to!

You know we had to!

12/18/2020

🎁Auction Alert🎁
Bidding ends tonight at midnight!
Support the Whaling Museum and get the perfect #gift for that special someone or yourself!!! #linkinbio
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#hamptons #sagharbor #museum #sagharborvillage #causes #donate #change #nonprofit #dogood #charity #fundraising #philanthropy #getinvolved #socialgood #impact #givemoretogether #giveback #auction #christmas #Chanukah #giftgiving #giftbasket #spaday #pamperyourself

Q: Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?A: We do!  And it's running out!Just TWO MORE DAYS to grab some goodies.  Ju...
12/16/2020
📅 Nov 30 | Sag Harbor Whaling Museum Holiday Campaign

Q: Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?

A: We do! And it's running out!

Just TWO MORE DAYS to grab some goodies. Just hit the link!

Thanks for your support!

https://event.gives/sagharborholiday/items

| Happy Holidays!Here is your opportunity to help the museum and get the perfect gift for your special someone at the same time!Thank you to our wonderful community who donated to the silent auction and to all of you for your support!Act Now - Bidding closes December 18th.We cannot wait to see you ...

🎁New Auction Item Alert🎁  CowShed gift basket courtesy of Ryland Life Equipment. The perfect #gift for that special some...
12/16/2020

🎁New Auction Item Alert🎁
CowShed gift basket courtesy of Ryland Life Equipment. The perfect #gift for that special someone or yourself!!! #linkinbio
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#hamptons #sagharbor #museum #sagharborvillage #causes #donate #change #nonprofit #dogood #charity #fundraising #philanthropy #getinvolved #socialgood #impact #givemoretogether #giveback #auction #christmas #Chanukah #giftgiving #giftbasket #spaday #pamperyourself

REMINDER:  Free Zoom Lecture TONIGHT!  Check out out website Events pages for all the details!
12/15/2020

REMINDER: Free Zoom Lecture TONIGHT! Check out out website Events pages for all the details!

🎁New Auction Item Alert🎁  Enjoy a mixed case of wine, a year’s membership to the wine club and a private tour of the vin...
12/13/2020

🎁New Auction Item Alert🎁
Enjoy a mixed case of wine, a year’s membership to the wine club and a private tour of the vineyards and wine making operations with winery cofounder, Larry Petrine. The perfect #gift for that special someone or yourself!!! #linkinbio
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#hamptons #sagharbor #museum #sagharborvillage #causes #donate #change #nonprofit #dogood #charity #fundraising #philanthropy #getinvolved #socialgood #impact #givemoretogether #giveback #auction #christmas #Chanukah #giftgiving #channingdaughters #wine #winetasting #vineyard #experience #winetime

🎁Holiday Auction Alert🎁 Find the perfect #gift for that special someone AND support the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum! #link...
12/10/2020

🎁Holiday Auction Alert🎁
Find the perfect #gift for that special someone AND support the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum! #linkinbio
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#hamptons #sagharbor #museum #sagharborvillage #causes #donate #change #nonprofit #dogood #charity #fundraising #philanthropy #getinvolved #socialgood #impact #givemoretogether #giveback #auction #christmas #Chanukah #giftgiving

12/02/2020

🎁Good Gift Giving🎁
Get the perfect #gift for that special someone and support the #SagHarborWhalingMuseum at the same time. #auction #bidding is now open and ends December 14. Thank you for your support! #linkinbio #givingtuesday #sagharbor #museum #charity #domoregood #volunteer #causes #donate #change #activism #nonprofit #dogood #charity #fundraising #philanthropy #getinvolved #socialgood #impact #givemoretogether #giveback

Address

200 Main St
Sag Harbor, NY
11963

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Comments

Preservation Long Island is pleased to present a 2020 Project Excellence Award to the community sponsors of the Sag Harbor Hills, Azurest, and Ninevah Subdivisions (SANS) National Register Historic District Survey and Nomination. This project demonstrates exceptional community-based advocacy for historic preservation and documents significant Jim Crow- and Civil Rights-era historic resources on Long Island.
My Great×4 Grandfather was the ships' steward on a whaling ship whose name escapes me, as I haven't seen his letters in over 35 years. I'm very proud of my heritage. I wish my uncle would send me copies, but we're out of touch. But, it's all in my heart.
The Museum sits on the corner of Main and Garden Streets. My Great, Great, Etc. Grandfather built a home on Garden St. in the 1830s. I summered there, and on Shelter Island as a young boy. I wish I could share my memories with you all.
You know it’s summer when the preparations begin for the museum fundraiser exhibit.
Just thinking you might like this!
Having Fun.....