Seattle PrideFest

Seattle PrideFest Seattle PrideFest is the largest free Pride Festival in the country. PrideFest is largest free pride festival in the United States, featuring 4 stages, world-class entertainment, measurable action and advocacy for the LGBTQ community, and tens of thousands of annual attendees.

Find us at the Seattle Center the last weekend of June every year to celebrate LGBTQ Pride. Seattle PrideFest is run by PrideFest, a 501c3 non-profit, with help from One Degree Events, who has helped produce the festival since 2007.

Mission: To honor the past, celebrate Pride in the present, and help prepare for the battles our community will have to fight in the future. We raise money for community non-profits and help feature them at the festival in unique ways to enable them to better do the work they do in the community.

We in the LGBTQ+ community can help to stop the spread of COVID-19! All it takes is a smartphone. Add #WANotify to your ...
12/02/2020

We in the LGBTQ+ community can help to stop the spread of COVID-19! All it takes is a smartphone. Add #WANotify to your phone. It is completely private and the more people who use it, the more effective it is.

For more information visit www.wanotify.org.

Today, we acknowledge World AIDS Day and the impact it has had on the LGBTQ+ community and the world at large. We expect...
12/02/2020

Today, we acknowledge World AIDS Day and the impact it has had on the LGBTQ+ community and the world at large. We expect to be back in 2021 with the Seattle Red Dress Party to benefit orgs who continue to do great work in the HIV/AIDS space.

The two Georgia runoffs are January 5 and they could decide the balance of power in the Senate. We are working with Geor...
11/30/2020

The two Georgia runoffs are January 5 and they could decide the balance of power in the Senate. We are working with Georgia Equality to help them raise funds to get out the vote in Georgia! We believe that when LGBTQ+ voters vote that we're more likely to get candidates that support progress for our community.

If you can give even a few dollars it will help to get out the LGBTQ+ vote in January. Donations are tax deductible. Georgia Equality Seattle Pride Gender Justice League Equal Rights Washington

https://secure.everyaction.com/axBs5mCEqUql5k3dJ1Ksgg2

It's Transgender Awareness Week. We like to see it as an action, not just a social media post. One way to educate yourse...
11/20/2020
From 'Disclosure' to 'Pose': What movies, shows to watch during Transgender Awareness Week

It's Transgender Awareness Week. We like to see it as an action, not just a social media post. One way to educate yourself is to watch a TV show, a movie, or a documentary to educate yourself. One we highly recommend is "Disclosure" (on Netflix). Very moving and lots of trans and non-binary voices represented.

It's Transgender Awareness Week, an annual period that promotes transgender visibility. Here's what to watch to educate yourself.

For our virtual Pride back in June, most of our artists performed from the stage at the Crocodile. Looks like that'll be...
11/16/2020
The Crocodile, where Nirvana, Pearl Jam and more have played, is moving, with big plans for the future

For our virtual Pride back in June, most of our artists performed from the stage at the Crocodile. Looks like that'll be the last "show" to be on that stage. We had a great time! Look forward to the next iteration of this iconic music venue.

After nearly 30 years, one of the city's most storied clubs is making an exit from the sticky-floored temple where musicians including Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Ben Gibbard and R.E.M. have played. The Crocodile is moving a few blocks away, taking...

What a loving tribute.
11/11/2020

What a loving tribute.

https://instagram.com/theaidsmemorial

When I was a little girl, we rented out a room in our large Haight-Ashbury flat to generate extra income. It was always rented to a young gay man, probably because my mum, a single parent, felt it was the safest and most sensible option. Their room was right next to mine in the front of the house and included a sitting room that we called the “library” because it had floor to ceiling bookcases, big puffy pillows on the floor and comfy nooks to settle in for reading or taking a nap. It was a common area in the house, but was mainly for our renter’s use, though I could often be found perched on the big overstuffed chair, peering out the window to observe the view of the always entertaining corner of Haight and Ashbury Streets.

If I wasn’t day dreaming, I had my nose buried in a book, such is the life of an only child in a household with no TV. Inevitably, our housemate would slide open the French doors that divided their room to the library and slowly, gently, tenderly, carefully, our friendship would unfold.

The men who lived with us all referred to themselves as my “fairy god-fathers” – their term; not mine. As a child, I didn’t understand the tongue in cheek we’re-taking-our-power-back meaning. Once I did, I both grimaced and grinned.

We had about five young men live with us over the years. This was in the late 70’s – early 80’s, before gay people could easily adopt kids or were even really allowed to think, dream about becoming parents in some cases. I was the only child in their circle of friends and was often invited to tag along to their ever so glamorous soirées, Oscar parties, holiday fetes and any other over the top event that might just really be a Tuesday night but always seemed like so much more to me. These outings gave my mum nights off from mum-ing and me, adventures to be fondly remembered decades later.

I often found myself sitting crossed leg in the middle of one of their friend’s exquisitely decorated antique filled living rooms in the Castro district on a priceless oriental rug, beading necklaces or playing with antique paper dolls (theirs, not mine), Judy blasting in the background, watching a group of lively young men gossip and flirt and dance and share stories about their hopes, dreams & fears.

I heard them talk about how they had escaped to SF from places like Iowa, Kentucky, Texas, so that they could live and love freely. They had all been disowned by their families for being gay. They had to create their own families and I was privileged to play the role of the little sister, niece, cousin they had to leave behind or, on an even deeper level, the child they never believed they would ever be able to have. It was from them that I learned my lifelong mantra: friends are the family we choose for ourselves. And love is love. Sorry Lin, but they said it first.

Of course, I was much too young to really understand the implications of all of this, but what I did know was that I felt so grown up and cherished in their presence. I knew there was something special about these men; to me they were worldly and fancy and sparkly and they knew a little something about everything. And most importantly, they taught me what they knew.

From them, I learned about music and fashion and art and literature and Broadway and why black and white movies of the 40’s were the best movies and that you must always bake with butter, never margarine and that cookie dough is calorie free and the power of the LBD and that one must always dress up when going downtown and the difference between Barbra Streisand & Barbara Stanwick; Bette Davis and Bette Midler; Oscar the Grouch and THE Oscars and the importance of wearing sunglasses, even in the fog, to prevent wrinkles, darling.

They were men of great style, class, elegance, intellect, wit, charm, creativity, beauty and fun. They were incredibly cultured and had exquisite taste. My memories of my time with them run deep:

Going to the “Nutcracker” every Christmas Eve.

Having high tea at Liberty House.

Lip syncing and dancing to the Andrew Sisters “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy.” I know all the words, still, to this day.

Taking in the Christmas decorations downtown at Macy’s and I.Magnin’s and ending the day with a cable car ride to Ghirardelli Square for hot chocolate with extra cherries and whipped cream.

Lengthy sermons on the essential need for dust ruffles and monogrammed stationery and silk dressing gowns.

To a young child, these experiences leave a mark; a permanent mark of rainbow colored glitter sprinkled on her soul.

To my child’s eye, mind and heart, these men were magical. They were my playmates; the most delightful big brothers to a shy, often sad & lonely little girl. They were fun and silly and played dress up and always let me be Cher to their Sonny. A major sacrifice on their part, to be sure!

They told me I was a glittering gem and that I was “fabulous” and they meant it in a REAL way, not a “hey girl hey” way, tho we had those moments too. They treated me with respect. They didn’t patronize or pander to me. They expected me to keep up my end of the conversation, regardless of the topic or my lack of knowledge about it. Local politics or Best Dressed at the Oscars; my opinion mattered to them. They didn’t baby me. They treated me like an equal. But that didn’t mean that they didn’t spoil and coddle me. They made me feel special and valued and respected. Perhaps because society didn’t offer them the same respect as gay men, they felt compelled to make sure I was always treated as a whole person. For a young girl of color, this went far in developing my sense of self and worth and pride in being who I was.

They also showered me with gifts, some that I still have to this day:

A beautiful hand-woven throw that made on an old-fashioned loom.

A hand beaded necklace with an antique tiny bell at its center. Too tiny now for my adult neck but still cherished.

A beautiful white cake stand from Tiffany’s; an odd gift for a 10-year-old girl, you might think, but as the gift giver said when he handed me the HUGE blue box, “Sweetie, if I’ve taught you nothing else, please remember this: the light blue box is always the BEST box!”

I still have those treasures, but I no longer have my fairy god-fathers.

They all eventually succumbed to AIDS. They were all in long-term relationships. Their partners died too. By the early 90’s they were all gone.

These men were the first and most prominent adult male figures in my young life; in truth, the only father figures I had growing up. I know for a fact that it is because of my time with them that I am the person, the woman, the friend, the activist, I am today.

They didn’t live to see the many strides and advances that the LGBTQ community has made. If they were still alive today, they would be at the front of the line continuing to fight the good fight for the strides still to be made.

But they aren’t, so I do it for them. It is the least I can do to honor their legacy and repay them for all they have given me.

My description of these men might seem almost disrespectful in its seemingly stereotypical depiction of gay men, but these were the men I knew, as I knew them, when I knew them. This was who they were, at a time when the gay community in SF was thriving and carefree; when the pulse of the disco beat of the day seemed to ring in sync with the beat of the cultural awakening that was taking the world by gloriously gay rainbow storm on the streets of SF.

I am so lucky that I spent my formative years as their fairy goddaughter, wrapped up in the glow of this historical time. But my golden carriage turned into a pumpkin well before midnight of my young adulthood dawned and my fairy god-fathers vanished with it.

I am a better human being because I knew them. THIS, I know for sure. My fairy god-fathers may be gone, but their rainbow colored fairy dust flows in my veins forever. They had their Pride. And they gave me mine, too. xo Lulu

📸 Crawford Barton

https://instagram.com/p/CHbd3VGjMwI/

#whatisrememberedlives #theaidsmemorial #aidsmemorial #neverforget #endaids

https://instagram.com/theaidsmemorial

11/08/2020

Celebrations continue on Capitol Hill in our own Black Lives Matter Plaza. There’s a dance party, honking cars, a few proud boys, and a decent sized crowd. If you go, please bring your mask and keep an eye out for those who came looking for trouble. Pike and 10th is the heart of it, right next to Cal Anderson Park.

Congratulations to President-Elect Biden and Vice-President Elect Harris. We feel hopeful that the next administration w...
11/07/2020
It's Official: Joe Biden Has Been Elected President, Kamala Harris VP

Congratulations to President-Elect Biden and Vice-President Elect Harris. We feel hopeful that the next administration will be much better for LGBTQIA+ people in America, and especially for our trans siblings whose rights have been under siege over the last four years.

The election was declared in the Democratic ticket's favor after Biden pulled ahead in Pennsylvania and effectively captured over 270 Electoral College votes.

As we await the nationwide election results, there is good news in the election results of individual states, like Nevad...
11/04/2020

As we await the nationwide election results, there is good news in the election results of individual states, like Nevada being the first state to protect same-sex marriage in its constitution. Progress!

BREAKING NEWS: Nevada becomes the first state in the nation to protect same-sex marriage in its constitution #NOH8

If you're in WA State, make sure to get your ballots into a dropbox by 8pm tomorrow, Tuesday, November 3. Let's not take...
11/03/2020

If you're in WA State, make sure to get your ballots into a dropbox by 8pm tomorrow, Tuesday, November 3. Let's not take all the LGBTQ+ progress of the last few years for granted. Make your voice count!

Episode 11 of the PrideCast is up! "Getting Out the LGBTQIA+ Vote"On today's PrideCast, hosts Egan Orion and Aleksa Mani...
10/22/2020
PrideCast Episode 11: Getting out the LGBTQIA+ Vote — Seattle PrideFest

Episode 11 of the PrideCast is up! "Getting Out the LGBTQIA+ Vote"

On today's PrideCast, hosts Egan Orion and Aleksa Manila take a deep dive into how the community is getting out the LGBTQIA+ vote and why it's important for us to vote. Special emphasis on Drag Out The Vote Ambassadors Aleksa Manila and Ceasar Hart. Plus, we speak with the Chair of the Washington State Democratic Party, Tina Podlodowski, about how to register and make sure your vote is counted, as well as some things she'll be looking for on November 3. Listen to this episode but more importantly: VOTE!

On today's PrideCast, hosts Egan Orion and Aleksa Manila take a deep dive into how the community is getting out the LGBTQIA+ vote and why it's important for us to vote. Special emphasis on Drag Out The Vote Ambassadors Aleksa Manila and Ceasar Hart. Plus, we speak with the Chair of the Washington St

43 years ago today, anti-gay crusader and orange juice ambassador (really) Anita Bryant got pied in the face. It was the...
10/14/2020

43 years ago today, anti-gay crusader and orange juice ambassador (really) Anita Bryant got pied in the face. It was the 70s and we had to be particularly scrappy because the notion of LGBTQ+ rights was only an idea in many places around the country. We've won countless battles to win and preserve our rights over the ensuing decades, but now is the time to be scrappy again. It starts with voting in the November election!

On this day, 14 October 1977, anti-gay crusader Anita Bryant was "pied" in the face by Tom Higgins, a gay rights activist. Bryant, who was already well-known as a singer, led Save Our Children, a homophobic campaigning group which successfully overturned legal protections for LGBT+ people in Dade County, Florida. Bryant had declared about homosexuality: "I will lead such a crusade to stop it as this country has not seen before." After being pied, Bryant burst into tears and began praying. Bryant was also brand ambassador for Florida orange juice, which then became subjected to a mass boycott campaign. Gay bars replaced screwdrivers (vodka and orange juice cocktails) with "Anita Bryants" – made with vodka and apple juice, with the profits donated to the campaign. Bryant's lucrative orange contract subsequently lapsed and her marriage failed, which caused her to be ostracised by some Christian fundamentalists who did not approve of her divorce. Later in life, Bryant's homophobic views softened, and she stated she was "more inclined to say live and let live". In 1998, Dade County reintroduced legal protections for LGBT+ people, and efforts by Christian groups to overturn them failed.
For this and hundreds of other stories, preorder our book out next month, Working Class History: Everyday Acts of Resistance & Rebellion, on our Kickstarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/workingclasshistory/working-class-history-the-book

For non-indigenous folx, Indigenous People's Day is a chance to educate ourselves. One especially important issue to spo...
10/12/2020
Saving Indigenous Trans Women

For non-indigenous folx, Indigenous People's Day is a chance to educate ourselves. One especially important issue to spotlight is murdered and missing indigenous women, but particularly to zoom in on trans and non-binary indigenous people. More attention is being paid, but much more is needed. #indigenouspeoplesday

A New Mexico task force held a special meeting this week to address violence against trans and queer Indigenous people.

Happy national coming out day! We recognize it’s not safe for everyone to come out—especially those trapped in an intole...
10/11/2020

Happy national coming out day! We recognize it’s not safe for everyone to come out—especially those trapped in an intolerant household during the pandemic—but for those who have come out, we encourage you to share your stories of liberation to your FB friends.

The NFL May be late to the party, but we’re encouraged by this progress. Tomorrow they celebrate out players in partners...
10/11/2020
NFL encourages players to come out in new PSA for National Coming Out Day

The NFL May be late to the party, but we’re encouraged by this progress. Tomorrow they celebrate out players in partnership with the Trevor Project.

The NFL is celebrating National Coming Out Day with a video featuring openly gay and bisexual former players encouraging current LGBTQ players to come out.

Address

305 Harrison St
Seattle, WA
98109

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Seattle PrideFest posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Seattle PrideFest:

Videos

Category

Nearby event/venues


Comments

Title: Nightmare at the end of the Road [lesbian/horror with humor] http://amzn.to/2DhXbSZ Author: Helen Dunn Long intrigued by a rutted country road that winds back into the woods, Wendy Stanton gets to know the horrors that exist at the end of that road when she meets the crazed, inbreeds of the Dixon family. Anyone who trespasses on their land usually isn't seen again! There's Arlen Dixon the head of the clan, Luraleen the blind matriarch, the sub-human T.J., and the strange, secretive girl named Fern, who may have more mysterious powers than any of them. Deputy Sheriff Callie Wingate, an outsider to Dixonville, is alarmed by the stories she hears about the Dixons, while at the same time she is fascinated by the beautiful, unusual Fern Dixon. As she tries to unravel the disappearance of Wendy Stanton, Callie gets to know the Dixons better than she ever wanted. FREE to those with Kindle Unlimited. Don't have a Kindle – no problem – you can get a free app from Amazon, at the book site, that will allow you to download an e-book to any reading device. A lesbian novella with doses of macabre humor/characters with strange, paranormal powers. A supernatural, mystery-thriller. The URL given is for Amazon USA, but this book and all my books are available in other countries where Amazon is on-line.
Title: ADVENTURES IN HOLLYWOOD [novelette] http://amzn.to/1oP5zfB Author: Helen Dunn FREE to those with Kindle Unlimited Don't have a Kindle? No problem--with a free app at the book site from Amazon you can download this book to any reading device. The URL given is for Amazon USA, but this book and all my books are available in other countries where Amazon is on-line. A revenge tale, where a homophobe gets what's coming to him—plus a great lesbian romance! Set in the 1950's. Marian Feldman Horiwitz, a lesbian in her early thirties, was doing well in a 'front' marriage with a gay man with whom she worked in films, under the names Kris and Karisma Harris. When she becomes a widow, she is faced with a financial situation when Hollywood doesn't want her since she's no longer part of a team. At the suggestion of a gay photographer friend, Karisma opens an acting school. She soon becomes romantically and sexually interested in one of her adult students, a very talented young actress who unfortunately has a brutish boyfriend. [Please Note: While one of the characters worked in horror films, there are no horror scenes in this story.] If you enjoy this book, please leave a review at Amazon. It will be much appreciated. Thank you.
SUNDAY PRIDE 2020 MIDDAY MIXER LIVE RITE NOW!
WE'RE LIVE RIGHT NOW BABY!
Together For Pride Live Streaming Online Link=>> https://bit.ly/3dCpXzF Link=>> https://bit.ly/3dCpXzF
Virtual WALK and Run with Pride 5K next week to. Record your own time. The proceeds this year will be benefit Peer Seattle, formerly known as Seattle Area Support Groups
What do we have cooking?
Like other Pride events, Run / Walk with Pride 2020 is going virtual. We're celebrating online June 26-29 and raising money for Peer Seattle. Full details can be found at www.runwalkwithpride.org.
Title: The House of Soleil LeVant [Novella] Author: Helen Dunn (Lesbian Fiction) Historical/Psychological Mystery http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BOELGRM When Clover Quick encounters the mysterious Soleil LeVant, the Madame of an expensive New Orleans brothel, during a night of gambling, she is instantly intrigued. Will she allow herself to become the bet that is placed by her conniving stepfather? What is the truth behind the mystery of Soleil LeVant? A book with a very unique twist. FREE TO THOSE WITH KINDLE UNLIMITED! If you don't have a Kindle you can still get this book via a free Amazon apps., at the book site, which will allow you to download to any reading device. The URL given is for Amazon USA, but this book and all my books are available in other countries where Amazon is on-line. If you read this book and enjoy it, please leave a review, it will be much appreciated. Thank you.
I see Minneapolis just cancelled their pride festival. Are you doing the same?
More than 100 global Prides have cancelled or postponed their events due to the coronavirus pandemic SEATTLE.... UHHHH WE DON'T KNOW YET....UHHHH