The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts at St. Bonaventure University

The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts at St. Bonaventure University The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts (QCA) is the home of St. Bonaventure University's world-class collection, a broad spectrum of art and historical artifacts.
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Museum admission is always free and open to the public. Mission Statement: The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts has as its mission to offer both the University community and the general public a program of professional, culturally diverse arts events and exhibitions of the highest artistic quality reflecting the values of the university and its curriculum. To that end, the Center collects, preserves, exhibits and interprets historic and contemporary visual art and cultural artifacts; presents and produces a performing arts season in a proscenium theater and maintains active outreach to six contiguous counties of the Southern Tier of western New York and northern Pennsylvania. The Center also provides facilities and resources for academic instruction in the visual and performing arts, including classrooms, galleries, and rehearsal and practice rooms. Facilities & Collections The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts is the home of St. Bonaventure University’s world-class collection, a broad spectrum of art and historical artifacts that span from the beginning of Western civilization into the contemporary era. The collection totals over 3,000 works including paintings, sculpture, pottery and porcelain, works on paper, photographs and a unique and diverse crèche collection. The Quick Center for the Arts boasts 18,000 sq. ft. of exhibition space containing six galleries, mezzanine and atrium hanging spaces and an Art History reference library. This space allows the museum to highlight its permanent art collection as well as touring exhibitions, special exhibitions developed in partnership with national museums and student and curriculum-related exhibitions. Additional facilities include instructional areas, a student interaction and creativity space, The Loft and a 321-seat proscenium theatre which is host to over 175 performances and events each year including professional presentations of music, theatre, dance and film, as well as lectures, symposia and academic performances.

Open with service changes; Online services available

The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts at St. Bonaventure University's cover photo
06/01/2020

The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts at St. Bonaventure University's cover photo

To all our friends, followers, and supporters - First and foremost, we want to thank you for joining us on this #MuseumF...
06/01/2020

To all our friends, followers, and supporters -

First and foremost, we want to thank you for joining us on this #MuseumFromHome journey as we transitioned to remote work and attempted to digitally share our collection.

We’ll unfortunately be signing off for a few months as the University begins furloughing employees in order to provide budget relief during the continual COVID-19 crisis.

We hope to be back soon, offering new and interesting ways to engage with our collections and institution!

Until then stay safe and continue creating!

The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts at St. Bonaventure University
06/01/2020

The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts at St. Bonaventure University

For today’s “Quick Moment of Zen,” it’s the final part of our series highlighting works from our collection that depicte...
05/29/2020

For today’s “Quick Moment of Zen,” it’s the final part of our series highlighting works from our collection that depicted isolation and social distancing before it became our everyday norm.

This work by Pierre Boncompain seems to channel the collective feelings of frustration, helplessness, exhaustion, or anger we’ve all been experiencing over the last few days.

Pierre Boncompain is a modernist French painter and printmaker.

Born in Valence, the gateway to Provence in 1938, Pierre Boncompain was encouraged by his parents to purse his artistic interests from an early age. In 1950, he moved to Paris to study at the French National Academy of Decorative Arts. He graduated first in his class before entering the National Academy of Fine Arts, where he studied in the Legueult atelier. His works, while executed for the most part in Paris, are regularly described as evocative of the environment and lifestyle of the South of France. Boncompain has often stated his work is always “celebratory, presenting the pleasures of life with a Mediterranean vividness.”

Boncompain’s work was heavily influence by a variety of modern artists specifically Henri Matisse, leader of the Fauvist movement; Paul Gauguin, one of the leaders of the French Post-Impressionist movement, and Milton Avery, a seminal American Abstract Expressionist. A rare departure from Boncompain’s noted style of using rich, deep colors, the use of black, white, and grey tones in this piece seems to be employed in order to enhance the overall emotion of the figure. Like his other work, Boncompain used flat forms to develop a sense of space and establish shape and dimension. The work depicts, it is assumed, Colette, Boncompain’s wife, against a single shaded wall, her elbows resting on some type of table or bar with her arms supporting her head.

Colette is rendered in the most simplistic forms; her clothing and hair almost create one shape on which her head rests. In front of her sits two lemons, a cup and saucer denoting the works title “Awakening with Lemons.” Choosing simple themes allowed Boncompain to experiment with artistic techniques so as to create a vision of life that he believed was superior to more realistic depictions. Simply defined using thick black lines, Colette’s facial expression is one of pain or perhaps ennui. She could be just waking up with the black and white coloration used to symbolize feelings of grogginess, her tea in front of her. The composition of her body suggests she is exhausted or depressed, the shift in the direction of her hair denoting her hands and arms are supporting her head. The sway of the body gives the work movement, as if she is pitching forward.

Boncompain has had exhibitions in Shanghai, Hong Kong, Beijing, Osaka, Tokyo, Lausanne, the United States, and throughout France and The Netherlands while his works can be found in public and private collections throughout the world. Still working, he currently spends his time with his wife, model, and muse, Colette, creating in his studios in Paris and Provence.

From the collection:
Pierre Boncompain (French, b. 1938)
Réveil au Citrons (Awakening with Lemons)
Lithograph
Signed lower right: Pierre Boncompain
Kenney Collection
Gift of F. Donald Kenney Foundation
1999.05.232

It’s #MuseumFromHome Time and today we’re releasing the final series of special Friday Funday digital backgrounds.Taken ...
05/29/2020

It’s #MuseumFromHome Time and today we’re releasing the final series of special Friday Funday digital backgrounds.

Taken from St. Bonaventure University's permanent art collection, these virtual backgrounds are a fun way to mix up your next staff meeting, let everyone subtly know your true feelings about being in quarantine, or make your friends and family crack a smile!

Each of these works from our collection has been customized to zoom specifications so they are perfect to use whether you have a green screen or not. Just remembered to import the correct option if you are mirroring your screen.

Click on your desired image and select "download" to save it to your computer from this Facebook post.

Learn how to use “Virtual Backgrounds” in Zoom here: https://youtu.be/3Zq-b51A3dA

For today’s “Quick Moment of Zen,” we’re continuing our series highlighting works from our collection that depicted isol...
05/29/2020

For today’s “Quick Moment of Zen,” we’re continuing our series highlighting works from our collection that depicted isolation and social distancing before it became our everyday norm.

There are two theories behind this work by John Dobbs:
1.) It is an unfinished work that was set aside to be completed at a later date but never was.
2.) The skull like image dominating the upper half of the painting is meant to symbolize some addiction, possession, ghost or type of evil leaving the body below. This could explain the facial expression of the uncompleted person in the bottom half of the work– painted in a state of ecstasy as the figure recovers from something that once afflicted them. The two images, when layered over top of one another, reestablish the complete person.

John Dobbs was an American figurative painter well known for his portraiture and stark, gritty depictions of the streets of New York City and the people who lived within them. A champion of Realism through the 20th century, Dobbs constantly tried to demonstrate that direct observation could coexist with Abstraction, Minimalism, Conceptual Art while harmonizing with a variety of other artistic movements.

Born in 1931 in Nutley, New Jersey, Dobbs grew up in an artistically centered family composed of visual artists, musicians, and poets. Living near the Lackawanna Railroad, where his grandfather had once worked as a railway express clerk, Dobbs stated that the cars running past his bedroom window gave him his first art lesson in one-point perspective. Dobbs attend the local public-school system near his home and upon graduation, decided to hitchhike across the United States undertaking various odd jobs. He eventually returned to the East Coast and his first love of art and began to study painting under Ben Shahn, Gregorio Prestopino and Jack Levine. He produced many studies and preparatory works but could never develop a distinctive style and thus did not exhibit heavily.

In 1952 Dobbs was drafted into the United States Army and was stationed in Germany. During his tour, he would sketch various servicemen both in and out of combat while also trying to capture post-war German life in the various cities and villages he visited. These sketches were eventually published as a chapbook in 1955 titled, “Drawings of a Draftee.” After completing his tour of duty, Dobbs returned to the United States and married French-Algerian literary scholar Anne Baudement.

In 1959, he again tried to relaunch his career, holding his first solo exhibition at the Grippi Gallery in New York. The new approach he presented seemed to combine his earlier artistic education with a hardened point of view rife with struggle, personal demons, and possibly the trauma of war. His works depicted figures embedded in alienating, modern landscapes seen in the distance or from behind, as if they were always departing the scene. The figures existed in frantic cityscapes that expanded into eerier suburban settings. They were depicted doing banal tasks like riding escalators, waiting on subway platforms, passing through turnstiles, or standing in silhouette, as if being viewed through plate glass windows or in the glare of sun on concrete. Dobbs choice of a cool color palette and composition of the figures however, imparted a sense of unease, even fury. The exhibition opened to rave reviews and secured his place in the New York art scene.

Dobbs became a Professor of Art at John Jay College, City University of New York in 1972, a position he held until he retired in 1996. In 1976 he was elected as a member of the National Academy and retained his membership until his death. In 1963, four years after his debut solo exhibition, painter Raphael Soyer included Dobbs—along with Edward Hopper, Leonard Baskin, Jack Levine and eight other figurative artists—in his large scale, group portrait, “Homage to Thomas Eakins,” establishing Dobbs as one of the preeminent American Realist painters.

Dobbs continued to paint for more than half a century, drawing upon themes that were described as both beautiful and highly disturbing. He worked from both memory and imagination while employing both literal and symbolic imagery to invoke America’s collective preoccupations and dreams. In his final works, Dobbs began to focus on acrobats, boxers and contortionists, rendering these figures against a flat background, in order to highlight their struggle against the physical laws of the natural world as well as their own bodily limitations. Dobbs died in his home in New York’s Greenwich Village, on August 9th at the age of 80.

From the collection:
John Dobbs (American, 1931-2011)
Recovery, 1974
Oil on canvas
Gift of the Henry Ward Ranger Fund,
National Academy of Design
2004.01.033

For today’s “Quick Moment of Zen,” we’re continuing our “Wellbeing Wednesday” series and isolation/social distancing the...
05/27/2020

For today’s “Quick Moment of Zen,” we’re continuing our “Wellbeing Wednesday” series and isolation/social distancing theme with this etching by Jacques Villon.

Villon employed various contour lines to establish the outline of the body, using basic shapes to give the suggestion of form in the sense of musculature and facial features. However, the frantic nature of the lines is principally employed to enhance the feel of the work, symbolic of anger surging throughout the body as if radiating via the geometric like enclosure of the entire figure. The raised arms, wide set legs, and open mouth suggest the figure is yelling out in despondency or animalist rage.

Jacques Villon was a French painter and printmaker associated with the Cubist, Futurist and Art Informel movements who created non-representational work derived from life. He was most well-known for constructing pieces that suggest the presence of landscapes, objects, or figures but that are designed in highly graphic compositions amid colorful backgrounds.

Born Emile Méry Frédéric Gaston Duchamp on July 31, 1875 in Damville, France, Villon was the half-brother of other famed artists Marcel Duchamp (Dadaism & Conceptualism), Suzanne Duchamp (Dadaism), and Raymond Duchamp (Cubism). Initially studying law at the University of Paris, Villon dropped out of the University in 1904 to begin taking art classes at the Académie Julian. From 1894 until 1906, he worked as a caricaturist and illustrator for several magazines in Paris and produced many posters and humoristic political cartoons. In 1906, Villon turned toward painting joining with other French artists to form "Section d'Or," a collective of painters, sculptors, poets, and critics associated with Cubism and Orphism. Villon suggested the name to emphasize the group’s interest in geometric proportions and it is largely credited as bringing Cubism to the attention of the general public in the wake of their then “controversial” showing at the Salon des Indépendants in 1911.

It was after this exhibition that Villon adopted his pseudonym, taken in honor of the French poet François Villon, and moved to Puteaux, a village near Paris, so he could as he described it “concentrate and work in peace.” While in Puteaux, Villon’s style matured, mixing Cubist elements of flat, geometric shapes with a palette of luminous colors. In 1913, Villon unveiled a number of his newly created works at the New York City Armory Show, which helped to promote his international reputation, but his success was short lived as the following year Villon was drafted into the French army at the outbreak of WWI.

Between the World Wars, Villon worked in relative obscurity, painting only abstract compositions based on color theory, and generally supported himself as a commercial printmaker, reproducing the works of other artists as etchings. Eventually he returned to a partially realistic depiction of portraits and landscapes, receiving praise for synthesizing an Impressionist inspired color palette with a Cubist analysis of form. Using the knowledge he gained while working as a commercial printer, Villon also became a prolific printmaker, completing more than 600 color lithographs, dry points, engravings, and etchings. Two retrospective shows of his paintings and prints were held in New York City in 1953, and he won the Grand Prix at the Venice Biennale in 1956. He continued to work until age 87 when he passed away in his studio in Puteaux, France on June 9, 1963.


From the collection:
Jacques Villon (French, 1875-1963)
La Colère (Anger)
Etching
Numbered bottom left: 7/60
Signed bottom right: Jacques Villon
F. Donald Kenney Collection
Gift of the F. Donald Kenney Foundation
1999.05.138

We’re continuing our “Wellbeing Wednesday” series with something to challenge you creatively during your evening hours!D...
05/27/2020

We’re continuing our “Wellbeing Wednesday” series with something to challenge you creatively during your evening hours!

Drawing is a great way to reduce overall stress levels and this process encourages creative thinking through low risk, high reward actions. Blind contour line drawing allows practitioners to feel a sense of accomplishment for completing a work based on exactly what they observe, instead of what they think their subject is supposed to look like. The process stimulates various points in the brain while the practice is almost meditative as you try and connect your mind, your sight line, and your hand. By concentrating on the subject, you become more present in the moment while the process itself is something you can practice almost anywhere.

Blind Contour Line Drawing:
Print out one of our “Complete the Painting” examples.

Situate its completed partner image in front of you. It is often helpful to have the image positioned in your direct sight line so you may resist the urge to move your head and thus check your work. Doing this also prevents neck strain.

Inspect the complete piece from our collection, first taking in its most basic elements like shape, line, and positive/negative space. Note the natural direction your eyes travel as you view the work.

Set a timer. We recommend 15 minutes, but if this feels too long, set a shorter time limit and increase the time length as you practice.

Begin the timer.

Set a point where you will begin your drawing.

Find the matching point on the printed page in front of you and place the tip of your pencil on the page.

Once the tip of your pencil and your line of vision are connected and anchored to this point, do not look at the page you are drawing on again.

Begin your drawing, following the contour of the piece from the collection you are observing.

As your eyes traverse the piece, imagine your hand is working in unison with your sight line. As your gaze moves around the piece, your hand follows it, directing the pencil around the paper.

Your “contour” focus may change as you continue to work through the image – you may begin by outlining people, plants, animals, or buildings but then transition to capturing larger shapes created by the shift of highlights to midtones to shadows.

Most importantly, make sure your eye, hand, and mind are working in unison and resist the urge to look down at what you are drawing or the urge to lift your pencil.

As you draw, shift among sections of the work and allow pieces to be connected. If the outline of a figure’s clothing aligns with the edge of a shadow or building, keep them connected. The goal is to not lift your pencil, so allow the contour lines to direct your hand.

Continue working for the entire time until your timer goes off.

When the timer goes off, stop, and inspect your work.

Compare the lines and shapes you’ve created with the completed piece from the collection and see how they form the building blocks of the entire piece.

Continue to practice.

The entire process can also be completed drawing from direct observation using a clean sheet of paper and pencil.


From the collection:
Jean Pierre Alexandre Antigna (French, 1817 - 1878)
Two Girls With A Dog, ca. 1870
Oil on canvas
Signed bottom right: Antigna
Col. Michael Friedsam Collection
Gift of Col. Michael Friedsam Foundation
1942.01.044

Theodore Robinson (American, 1852 - 1896)
Farm Scene Near Giverny, c. 1888
Oil on canvas
Signed bottom right: Th. Robinson
Hanley Collection
Gift of T. Edward Hanley
1956.02.004

Lillian Mathilde Genth (American, 1876 - 1953)
Two Women in an Interior, The Gossips
Oil on canvas
Signed bottom left: L. Genth
Hanley Collection
Gift of T. Edward Hanley
1956.02.003
Conserved in 2008 through the Lower Hudson Conference, Conservation Treatment Grant

Jan Victors (Dutch, 1620 - 1676)
The Gypsy Fortune Teller, c.1646 - 1655
Oil on canvas
Gift of Hendrik Van der Horst
1945.01.001
Conserved in 2005 through the Lower Hudson Conference, Conservation Treatment Grant

Address

3261 W State Rd
St. Bonaventure, NY
14778

Opening Hours

Monday 12:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 12:00 - 16:30
Wednesday 12:00 - 17:00
Thursday 12:00 - 17:00
Friday 12:00 - 16:30
Saturday 12:00 - 16:00
Sunday 12:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(716) 375-2494

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Mission Statement: The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts has as its mission to offer both the University community and the general public a program of professional, culturally diverse arts events and exhibitions of the highest artistic quality reflecting the values of the university and its curriculum. To that end, the Center collects, preserves, exhibits and interprets historic and contemporary visual art and cultural artifacts; presents and produces a performing arts season in a proscenium theater and maintains active outreach to six contiguous counties of the Southern Tier of western New York and northern Pennsylvania. The Center also provides facilities and resources for academic instruction in the visual and performing arts, including classrooms, galleries, and rehearsal and practice rooms. Facilities & Collections The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts is the home of St. Bonaventure University’s world-class collection, a broad spectrum of art and historical artifacts that span from the beginning of Western civilization into the contemporary era. The collection totals over 3,000 works including paintings, sculpture, pottery and porcelain, works on paper, photographs and a unique and diverse crèche collection. The Quick Center for the Arts boasts 18,000 sq. ft. of exhibition space containing six galleries, mezzanine and atrium hanging spaces and an Art History reference library. This space allows the museum to highlight its permanent art collection as well as touring exhibitions, special exhibitions developed in partnership with national museums and student and curriculum-related exhibitions. Additional facilities include instructional areas, student interaction and creativity spaces, and a 321-seat proscenium theater which is host to over 175 performances and events each year including professional presentations of music, theater, dance and film, as well as lectures, symposia, academic and student performances.

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